Somerset

Ashwick, Church of Saint James.   First mentioned early 15th century, chapel of ease to Kilmersdon.  This building has c.1450 tower, remainder rebuilt in 19th century.  No known images of Saint James. The Fosse Way passes on eastern boundary of parish. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia..  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Bath, Church of Saint James (no longer exists).   It is thought that the first church was Saxon.  This building was converted into a private chapel for the Bishop’s Palace in the 13th century, and a new parish church of Saint James being built in a different location.  The church was rebuilt in a striking Italianate style in the 19th century but was severely damaged in an air raid in 1942 and subsequently demolished.  Information and images can be found at freshford.com, southernwalks.co.uk and Bath Past.   CSJ holds some clippings of articles about the 19th century church.  Church was associated with South Gate which led to the Fosse Way.

Beercrocombe, Church of Saint James.   13/14/15th century with 19th century restoration.  No known images of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Village Website..  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Butleigh, Church of Saint Leonard.  Saxon origins, this building mainly 14th and 19th century.  Saint James is reported in early stained glass – more information and images please.  Information  can be found at British Listed Buildings and CofE Website.  Image of church at Dawsonheritage.co.uk.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Cameley, Church of Saint James (now redundant).   12th century with 15th century west tower.  No known images of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and information and images at the Churches Conservation Trust .  More images at Dawsonheritage.co.uk. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Chard, Fair of Saint James, prescriptive but confirmed to the burgesses by charter in 1271 ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Somerset 2010.

Charlton Musgrove, Stavordale Priory (1243 – 1539), dedicated to Saint James. Priory seal depicted Saint James with staff, book, scrip and shell (image here). Altar of Saint James reported in 1374. Now owned by Sir Cameron Mackintosh.  See British History Online and Wikipedia for details/image.

Chillington, Church of Saint James.   Possibly built on prehistoric site, originated in 13th century as dependent chapel of South Petherton.  Later medieval additions and 19th and 20th century restorations.  No known images of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online, image at Geograph.org.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Chilton Cantelo, Church of Saint James.  Believed to have Norman origins (12th century font is earliest part of this building), 15th century tower, 19th century restoration  Later medieval additions and 19th and 20th century restorations.  No known images of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and image by Eugene Birchall at Geograph.org.  Church is associated with the rather curious tale of Theophilus Broome, a Parliamentarian who lived in fear of post-mortem punishment under the Restoration, such as that meted out to Oliver Cromwell. To avoid his body being disturbed and his head displayed on a pike he arranged for his body to be interred at Saint James’ and his head to be kept at Higher Farm across the street, where it remains to this day, with associated spooky tales about various attempts to reunite body and skull – see here. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

East Brent, Church of Saint Mary the Blessed Virgin.  15/17th century with 19th century restoration. Saint James depicted in stained glass window.  Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at greatenglishchurches website and image of window at therosewindow website.  An image of the window would be helpful.

East Lambrook, Church of Saint James.   12th century origins, with later additions until 18th century and 19th century restoration.  No known images of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website, more images of exterior and churchyard at www.maryjane-sue.co.uk.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Farleigh Hungerford, Church of Saint Leonard.  15th century with 19th century remodelling. Saint James depicted in stained glass window (staff with gourd, bag, book).  Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings, and image of window at therosewindow website.  CSJ has a photograph of the window but a good digital image of the window would be helpful.  There is a suggestion that Saint James was once depicted in a border of a ceiling painting, is this still extant?  More information please.

Fitzhead

  • Church of Saint James, previously dedicated to Saint Mary Magdalene, change in dedication sometime after 1848 – see British History Online.   15th century tower, remainder 19th century.  No known images of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Village Website. CSJ holds a guide sheet and a notelet illustration.
  • Churchyard Cross, 14th century, top part of shaft and lantern replaced in early 20th century, Saint James depicted on north side of lantern.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and image on Village Website, and close up image of lantern on Flickr.

Glastonbury

  • Chapel of Saint James, late 15th century slipper chapel for Glastonbury Abbey, now converted to a private house named Jacoby Cottage.  For information see British Listed Buildings, for information and location see British History Online and glastonburyantiquarians.org, for images see Pastscape and Flickr.  Image of building for CSJ records would be welcome.
  • Abbey.  Founded in Saxon times, and the coronation and burial site of Saxon kings, Glastonbury grew to become the second wealthiest abbey in the country, partly because of the great number of pilgrims who came to visit the many relics and possibly the holy thorn (first mention of this is early 16th century).  Glastonbury was also one of the most inventive abbeys when it came to pilgrimage, not only did it claim possession of a variety of relics which were in fact disputed by other religious institutions (such as the relics of Saint Dunstan), but in 1191 it announced the discovery of the tomb of King Arthur.  Information about the abbey can be found at Wikipedia and Glastonbury Abbey website.  Please note that pilgrims are welcome to attend services at the abbey (still held weekly at Saint Patrick’s Chapel), and there is an annual pilgrimage to the abbey, see glastonburypilgrimage for details.
  • George Hotel and Pilgrims’ Inn, 15th century pilgrim hospice, still a pub, restaurant and hotel.  For information see British Listed Buildings and for information and image see Wikipedia and georgeandpilgrim website.
  • Chapel of Saint Margaret and Almhouses. Thought to have originated in 13th century as a pilgrim hospice, later almshouses.   See British Listed Buildings (where it is listed as Saint Mary Magdalene’s) and Small Pilgrim Places Network for details.  Further information/evidence on origins welcome.
  • Holy wells.  There are two wells in Glastonbury. Please note the Chalice Holy Well is unlikely to have been a medieval holy well but seems to have been a standard water source for the abbey which has much later become the focus of legends about Joseph of Arimathea and Arthur owing to its red water.  Similarly, the White Spring is in fact a Victorian reservoir built on the site of a natural spring, again no evidence is available regarding this as a medieval holy well.

Langport, Church of All Saints (now redundant).   Some of church 12/13th century, most is 15/16th century with 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in medieval stained glass with pilgrim hat, staff and book. Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings and information and images at the Churches Conservation Trust .  Therosewindow website has a picture of the window here and a close up of the Saint James pane here. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Long Sutton, Fair of Saint James, by charter 1267 ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Somerset 2010.

Milton Clevedon, Church of Saint James.  Church has existed here from 12th century although building mainly dates from 1790 rebuild and extensive 19th century restoration. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  There is a medieval niche with restored carvings of the Virgin and Saint James, although this would appear to be Saint James the Less with book and club – see Britainexpress website for image.  Further information on dedication history (Saint James dedication first mentioned in 1545 – see British History Online) would be welcome.  Image of church on Geograph.org.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Old Cleeve, Fair of Saint James, by letter patent 1466, granted to abbot of Cleeve Abbey to be held at the manor ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Somerset 2010.

Preston Plucknett (Yeovil), Church of Saint James.   Built in 1420 as a chapel to Saint John the Baptist, Yeovil, substantial 19th century restoration.  No known images of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.  15th century cross in churchyard, weathered lantern now displayed in church, see British Listed Buildings.  Image at Geograph.org. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Regil, Church of Saint James. Built 19/20th century as a mission church to the parish of Winford. No known images of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at Parish Website. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Southstoke, Church of Saint James. Built 12th century with 15th and 19th century alterations.  Saint James depicted in a carving over north door, set in a scallop shell, also reported in stained glass but no evidence found as yet. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.  In the churchyard there is a memorial preaching cross to Capt, John Samer who died in 1916, Saint James is reported carved on one side of the lantern, see British Listed Buildings for information and images.  CSJ holds some black and white images for this church.  Imformation/image of stained glass would be welcome.

Taunton, medieval wool town on strategic crossing point of River Tone.  Links with ports like Topsham and Lyme Regis.  CSJ holds various information/notes on the town.

  • Church of Saint James, possibly Saxon origins, a church was in existence on this site in the 12th century (just outside medieval walls/ditches) and was associated with the nearby priory. The current building is 15th century with substantial 19th C remodelling.  Saint James is reported depicted on the restored medieval font, although we do not have a clear image of this.   See British Listed Buildings and Church Website for details.  CSJ holds a guide booklet for church which confirms that the scallop shell is frequently encountered in the decoration of the church.
  • Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, possibly Saxon origins, a church was in existence on this site in the 12th century and became parish church of Taunton in early 14th century. The current building is 15th century with substantial 19th C remodelling.  Saint James is reported depicted in a niche between the clerestory windows, although we do not have an image to confirm this this. See British Listed Buildings and Church Website for details.

Upton

  • Tower of Saint James (all that remains of 14th century church).  See The Churches Conservation Trust website for details and images.
  • Church of Saint James, built 19th century to replace the demolished 14th century building.  See Exmoorian Website for information and images. No known depictions of Saint James.

Winscombe, Church of Saint James.   In existence by 13th century, origins may be earlier, this building mainly 15th century with 19/20th century restorations.  Saint James statue on eastern exterior of tower (binoculars needed to see this clearly). Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Parish Council Website, more images at Dawsonheritage.co.uk.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Also of Interest:

Chapel Cleeve Manor, built in 15th century as a pilgrim hospice to those visiting the Chapel of Saint Mary (chapel now disappeared).  Substantial later alterations to become a stately home. See Wikipedia, British Listed Buildings and British History Online for details.

Dunster, Church of Saint George.  Medieval stained glass containing a “palmer’s hat with cockle shells on the brim”.  Information can be found at Church Website history and guide.  An image of the window would be very helpful so we can see if it is in fact Saint James or pilgrim-related.

Muchelney, Abbey.  Saxon foundation, second-oldest abbey in Somerset, likely to have been a focus for many pilgrims.  A depiction of Saint James in stained glass is reported in the Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, more information and images would be welcome.  See Wikipedia and English Heritage website for details of the abbey

Pendomer, Church of Saint Roch, 13th century origin, church mainly 14/15th century.  Considerable repair and restoration has been carried out since 1979 when Mr E Sandiford left a generous bequest to the church.  See British Listed Buildings for information and Village Website for a PDF booklet with detailed history and pictures.

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