England

Bedfordshire

Beadlow (Beaulieu), Fair of Saint James by 1293 charter ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Bedfordshire 2007.

Bedford, Church of Saint Paul.  Saxon collegiate church in origin, largely destroyed by King John to fortify castle, rebuilt 1224, significant alterations in 15th and 19th centuries. Painted wooden carving of Saint James on roof support, is this medieval or Victorian? Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and GENUKI.  Church website here, history section not working as at April 2015. Image of Saint James carving can be found at Bedfordshire Parish Churches.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, a clearer image would be very helpful.

Biddenham, Church of Saint James.   Norman origin, rebuilt in 13/14th century with later medieval additions/alterations.  Saint James in two stained glass windows – 19th century east window and modern south window, also a scallop shell in a 20th century stained glass window. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Church Website, British History Online.  Images can be found at Bedfordshire Parish ChurchesChurch Website and images of windows at SJITBI Flickr group. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Blunham, Church of Saint Edmund or Saint James.   Almost certainly dedicated to Saint Edmund but known locally as Saint James, perhaps because of Blunham Feast, a local fair held on Saint James Day from 1314 until early 20th century.  Norman origins, mainly Tudor building, Victorian restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, English Church Architecture, British History Online.  CSJ holds a copy of The Parish Church of St Edmunds (or St James), Blunham, Bedfordshire by A.R.Allen, 1993.

Chalgrave, Church of All Saints.   1219 onwards, tower collapsed 1889, rebuilt 1931.  Saint James in 14th century wall painting, with other apostles. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Ampthill & District Archaelogical and Local History Society.  A new website for the church is under construction as at April 2015. More images of the exterior can be found at Bedfordshire Parish Churches.  CSJ also holds a copy of a 2002 guide for this church.

Clifton, Church of All Saints.   14th/15th century, Victorian restoration.  Saint James holding a scallop shell painted on 15th century wood rood screen, with 15 other saints. Rood screen was restored 1988 -92. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Guide.  Images can be found at Bedfordshire Parish Churches (exterior views only) and The Conchological Society of Great Britain & Ireland.  CSJ holds a newspaper cutting about the restoration of the screen.

Felmersham, Church of Saint Mary, 13th century.  1951 stained glass window by Francis Spear depicts Saint James holding a scallop shell and staff, and with a bag/knapsack.  Window is a memorial to three brothers who died on active service, and also their nurse who died after a long illness, during WWII.  The parish website has information on the church here, and on the window here.  Information on the three brothers here. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Linslade, Church of Saint Barnabas, 19th & 20th century.  Stained glass window by Percy Bacon depicts Saint James.  Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings Parish Website and Church Website. Images at SJITBI Flickr group.   The church of Saint Barnabas was built to serve modern Linslade which had developed around the railway and canal, over a mile away from the medieval church of Saint Mary the Virgin in Old Linslade.  This church was a focus of pilgrimage since there was a holy well situated nearby (site now on bank of Grand Union Canal) although there was an attempt to suppress this as early as 1299.  Information about church at British Listed Buildings and CRSBI, about church and well at Leighton-Linslade Past Times, and about well at Bedfordshire Council, with map here.

Pulloxhill, Church of Saint James.   1219 onwards, major 19th century rebuild as it seems that original church building had fallen into considerable disrepair.   Saint James depicted in stained glass in east window (hat with shell, staff with gourd, book), plus a banner with shells. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online and Church Website.  Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Potton, Fair of Saint James by 1227 charter ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Bedfordshire 2007.

Silsoe, Church of Saint James the Great.   Existed as a chapel of ease dedicated to Saint Leonard from 13th century (belonged to Elstow Abbey).  Rebuilt 1830 – 31 right next-door to original chapel and became parish in its own right in 1846.   Saint James depicted on painted and gilded reredos (hat with shell, scrip, staff, boots). Shells on banners and kneelers. Date of change of dedication unknown, however is likely to have coincided with rebuilding.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online and Church Website.  Images here and at SJITBI Flickr group.

Yelden, Church of Saint Mary the Virgin.   13th/14th century.  Medieval wall painting of Saint James dressed as a pilgrim. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Tobeit Curteis Associates.  Image can be found at Painted Church.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Other places of interest:

Barton-le-Clay, Church of Saint Nicholas, stained glass window of Saint James reported, further information and/or images would be welcome.

Edworth, Church of Saint George, stained glass window of Saint James reported, further information and/or images would be helpful.

Husborne Crawley, Church referred to as Saint James, Saint Mary Magdalene or Saint Mary & Saint James.  If anyone can help us with information on this it would be much appreciated.

Stevington, Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, holy well, medieval cross and hospitium site in village.  Stevington is a waypoint on the 77 mile circular John Bunyan Trail for those interested in visiting sites where Bunyan lived, preached and was imprisoned, and in walking the beautiful landscape of the Chilterns which inspired John Bunyan when he wrote The Pilgrim’s Progress. The CSJ holds some notes concerning Bunyan’s connections with the local area.

Wilden, Church of Saint Nicholas, stained glass window of Saint James reported, further information and/or images would be welcome.

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Berkshire

Barkham, Church of Saint James.  First recorded in 1220, the church was rebuilt 1859 – 61. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online.  Images at The Medieval Combat Society.     CSJ also holds a postcard of this church.

Finchampstead, Church of Saint James.  Probably sited on or near an ancient pagan site, the origin of the church is likely to be Saxon.  The current building was begun around 1120 with assistance from Reading Abbey, with the tower built in 1720 and various 19th century alterations. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Berkshire History Society and Church Website.  Images at church’s Flickr Group.

Reading

  • The Abbey of Reading, dedicated to the Virgin and St John the Evangelist. One of the most important pilgrimage sites in medieval England, it contained over 200 relics, including the hand of Saint James.  A shrivelled hand found in the ruins in 1786 is believed to be the relic, hidden during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and is now in Saint Peter’s RC Church in Marlow, Bucks.   The ruins are in the centre of the modern town, including the Inner Gate restored in 1861 by Sir Gilbert George Scott.  The only building to survive is the Hospitium which, much altered, is now used as an office.  Information and images can be found at Wikipedia, Reading Museum and Royal Berkshire History. The CSJ also holds the following items:
    • Reading Abbey booklet – Reading Museum & Art Gallery
    • The Hand of St James at Reading – Brian Kemp – Reading Medieval Studies Vol XVI 1990
    • The Seals of Reading Abbey – Brian Kemp – photocopied article
  • RC Church of Saint James in the Abbey grounds, built 1837- 40 by Pugin, with 20th century additions.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website, which also has a virtual tour and some very good images of the church.  There is a shrine of Saint James with a painted wooden statue of the saint and modern artwork on his life, legends and the pilgrimage.  Saint James also appears in a stained glass window and scallop shells are to be found in decoration throughout the building.  The CSJ also holds the following publication: St James’s Catholic Church & School in the Abbey Ruins Reading – a brief history by John Mullaney M.A.

Reading Borough Council are implementing (as at April 2015) a “Reading Abbey Revealed” project to improve signage and educational activities in the Abbey Quarter.  More information can be found about this on the Reading Museum website.

Ruscombe, Church of Saint James.  Chancel dates from late 12th century, tower from 1638, the church was also restored twice in the 19th century. Depictions of Saint James reported carved on interior of west door (1912) and in 13th century wall painting in arch on east wall (although British History Online states that only Saints Peter and Paul can be identified with any confidence). Further information/images would be very helpful.  Information and image can be found at British Listed Buildings and further information at British History Online.  CSJ also holds a guide booklet for this church.

Slough, Church of Saint Mary. 19th century church with Saint James depicted with pilgrim hat, staff and scallop shells in stained glass east window by Kempe.  Church website gives some details, an image of the window would be very useful indeed.

Also of interest:

Windsor Castle, The Queen’s Free Chapel of the College of St George, known as Saint George’s Chapel.  Containing the tombs of Henry VI and Sir John Schorne, and a fragment of the True Cross, this was another very important pilgrim destination in medieval times.  Sir John’s relics were translated to Saint George’s Chapel in Windsor in 1478 by the Yorkist King Edward IV, possibly as an attempt to lure pilgrims from the new and growing cult of the murdered Lancastrian King Henry VI at nearby Chertsey. More information can be found about Sir John and North Marston Church of The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary under Also of Interest in the Buckinghamshire section.  Information about Saint George’s Chapel can be found at Wikipedia and steorges-windsor.org.  The CSJ also holds a Museum of London booklet King Henry of Windsor And The London Pilgrim by Brian Spencer.

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Buckinghamshire

Many thanks to Michael Mooney for putting in an enormous amount of work visiting churches to collect information and images, and suggesting various additions to this section.

Akeley, Church of Saint James.   Built 1154, manor and church under control of Cluniac priory of Saint Faith in Longueville, Normandy until 14th century.   Rebuilt in 1854 but fell into disrepair and was demolished in 1979. Information can be found at Wikipedia and Parish Council Website, which has some old b/w photos of the village showing the church in the background.

Ashley Green, Church of Saint John the Evangelist, 19th century.  Saint James depicted in 1949 stained glass window by C.E.Moore (memorial to James Henry Townsend Green). Information on church can be found on Wikipedia and images of church and window on SJITBI Flickr group.

Aston Abbots, Church of Saint James.   From Saxon times until the Reformation this church was in the hands of the Abbey of Saint Alban.   Current building is mainly 19th century, the west tower is late 15th/early 16th century.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online and Village website history and church pages.  Images on SJITBI Flickr group.

Barton Hartshorn, Church of Saint James.   13th century with later additions,19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in early 20th century stained glass window by Kempe. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online.  Images of church at Blasdale Biographical Blog. Images, including window, can be seen on the SJITBI Flickr group.

Beaconsfield, Church of Saint Mary & All Saints.   Late 15th century with later additions,19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted as child with staff and shell in early 1898 century stained glass window. Information on church can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.   Images of church and window at SJITBI Flickr group.

Bierton, Church of Saint James.   Church existed in 13th century, this building is from 14th century, restored 19th century.  No known depictions of Saint James, scallop shell decoration reported on exterior. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online, and Wikipedia.  Images at SJITBI Flickr group.  Nearby Holy Well dedicated to Saint Osyth.  The CSJ holds a guide leaflet for this church.

Boarstall, Church of Saint James.   Medieval in origin, mainly destroyed during Civil War.  Rebuilt 19th century.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online and Wikipedia.  Images at erros.co.uk and SJITBI Flickr group. More information would be helpful.

Broughton, Church of Saint Lawrence, now redundant and in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.  14th/15th century with 19th century restoration, during which medieval paintings were uncovered. One of these – a fragment depicting feet, robe, staff and scrip – is thought to be Saint James.  See British Listed Buildings for information and Churches Conservation Trust website for information on the church and more information on the paintings here and here.  Images at SJITBI Flickr group.  CSJ holds a guide booklet for this church.

Calverton, Church of All Saints.  7th century origin but entirely rebuilt in19th century after 11th/12th century tower collapsed.  Saint James is depicted in two windows.  Please note one window with a pilgrim figure is identified as Saint Roch, but the figure holds a book (symbol of an apostle), and lacks the dog and leg wound attributes of Saint Roch. Information and images at Parish Website. Images at SJITBI Flickr group.

Chetwode, Church of Saint Mary & Saint Nicholas.  Two churches were built in Chetwode in the 13th century; a parish church of Saint Martin and this building, to serve the priory at Chetwode.  In 1480 the priory was dissolved and this became the parish church as the existing church of Saint Martin had fallen into disrepair.  The church you see today is the chancel of the priory church, with a 15th/16th century tower and some 19th century restorations.  Saint James is depicted with knapsack, shells and staff in a c.1842 stained glass window by Holland of Warwick. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, and British History Online, images (including window) at SJITBI Flickr group. The CSJ holds a guide leaflet for this church.

Downley, Church of Saint James, 19th century origin, current building is 1970s and third since foundation.  Saint James depicted in a modern stained glass window (by Tabitha Smith & Lucy Perkins of Buckinghamshire Chilterns University College, 2001). Information on church can be found on Church Website.  Images of church (including window) at SJITBI Flickr group.

Drayton Beauchamp, Church of Saint Mary, mainly 15th century but re-using earlier material, 19th restoration. Saint James depicted with book and sword in 15th century stained glass in east window. Information on church can be found at British Listed Buildings  and Church Website.  Images at SJITBI Flickr group.

Edlesborough, Church of Saint Mary (now redundant).   13th century nave, 14th century tower and 15th century clerestory.  19th and 20th century repairs and restorations (wooden spire lost to fire in 1828). Saint James depicted as pilgrim with staff, hat with shell and book in medieval stained glass window. Information on church can be found at British Listed Buildings (also image of window) and The Churches Conservation Trust.  This church also has a wealth of medieval woodwork and 19th century wall paintings.  Images at SJITBI Flickr group.  CSJ holds a guidebook for the church by Christopher Dalton.

Farnham Royal, Church of Saint Mary.   13th century chancel, remainder rebuilt in 19th century.  Saint James depicted as a barefoot pilgrim with staff and palm branch in 1868 Morris & Co stained glass window. Information on church can be found at Slough History Online.   Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Fulmer, Church of Saint James.   Church existed in 13th century as chapelry of Datchet, this building is from 1610, with 19th century additions.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British History Online, and Church Website.  Further images at SJITBI Flickr group. CSJ holds a 1951 leaflet for this church, more up-to-date information would be helpful.

Gerrards Cross, Church of Saint James.  1861, originally built as a memorial to Col G A Reid, it has an Italianate campanile and Chinese turrets.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website. Images at SJITBI Flickr group.

Great Horwood

• Church of Saint James.  This building dates from c. 1340, and was restored 1874 by Sir Gilbert Scott, although a church was known to have existed here earlier.  The church and manor were at one time held by the Cluniac priory of Saint Faith in Longueville, Normandy. Saint James is depicted several times:

  • East window, 1886 by Burlison & Grylls shows the Martyrdom of Saint James
  • 19th century mosaic reredos shows Saint James with a scroll
  • There is a damaged oak statue that may be Saint James but is too disfigured to identify positively.

Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online, and information and images of the church on the Church Website.   CSJ holds a leaflet for this church (which can now be downloaded from the church website link given).  Images of the window, reredos and oak statue are now on the SJITBI Flickr group.

• Fair of Saint James the Apostle, by charter 1447 ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Buckinghamshire 2005

Hanslope

Latimer, Church of Saint Mary Magdalene.   Church existed in 14th century as chapel of Saint James, dependent on the church in Chesham.  The church was rebuilt in the 19th century and consecrated to Saint Mary Magdalene.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British History Online and Bucks County Council.  CSJ holds a postcard for this church, more information/images of the medieval chapel would be helpful.  CSJ holds a guide to the village which includes a section on the church history.  Images of 19th century church of Saint Mary Magdalene on SJITBI Flickr group.

Little Kimble, Church of All Saints.  12th/14th century, restored 19th century.  Saint James depicted as a pilgrim in early 14th century wall painting. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Sacred Destinations.  More images at the SJITBI Flickr group.

Marlow, RC Church of Saint Peter.  1846, by Pugin.  Holds a relic said to be the hand of Saint James, discovered hidden in the ruins of Reading Abbey. Information can be found at Church Website and Reading Museum Website.  Article about the hand and the CSJ on Local Berkshire website.

New Bradwell, Church of Saint James.  1858-60.  1911 south aisle stained glass window of Saint James with book and staff, Saint James is also depicted in east window with staff, gourd and hat slung on back). Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website (very nice panorama of church interior).   Images of the church and windows can be seen on SJITBI Flickr group.  CSJ holds a guide booklet for the church; St James Church, New Bradwell – Celebrating 150 years by David Folwell and Jennifer Cooper.

Newport Pagnell, Church of Saint Peter & Saint Paul.  14th – 20th century building.  19th century Alexander Gibbs stained glass window of Saint James with staff and shell, also Saint James depicted in medieval carving on roof support (pilgrim hat with shell, bag and book).  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.   More images at the SJITBI Flickr group.  The CSJ holds a guide leaflet for this church.

Old Amersham, Church of Saint Mary.  First mentioned 1140, mainly 14th/15th centuries, restored 19th century.  Saint James is depicted with staff and gourd in the east window (the glass is by Abraham van Linge and dates from around 1630; it was originally in the chapel of Lamer House at Wheathampstead in Hertfordshire). Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.   More images at the SJITBI Flickr group. CSJ holds a fairly substantial guide booklet for the church St Mary’s Church, Amersham: A Brief History and Guide by MJC Andrews-Reading, 2004.

Petsoe, Chapel of Saint James.   Existed in 1151, joined to Ekeney in 15th century.  Nothing remains of either building.  Information can be found at  British History Online.

Stony Stratford, Church of Saint Mary & Saint Giles.  15th century tower, enlarged 18th and 19th centuries.  19th century stained glass window of Saint James with staff and bag. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.   Image of window available on SJITBI Flickr group.

Also of interest:

Bradwell Abbey, a major Marian pilgrimage site. A chapel of “Our Ladie of Bradwell” was built around onto the abbey church around 1330 to accommodate pilgrims who came to visit a statue of the Virgin on the west facade that was reputed to have healing powers – see Milton Keynes City Discovery Centre website.  The pilgrimage chapel still stands  – the only surviving building from the abbey.

Buckingham, Saint Rumbold’s Well, important pilgrim site until the Reformation with pilgrims travelling to visit the shrine of Saint Rumbold in the old church in Buckingham and sample the curative waters of the nearby holy well.  The old church was demolished in the later 18th century and nothing now remains of the shrine or tomb.  Information can be found at the University of Buckingham website and information and images at The Megalithic Portal.

North Marston

  • Church of The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary.  13th century with later medieval additions, restorations in 19th and 20th centuries.  This became a major pilgrimage site during the 14th century because of the reputation of the relics of its rector Sir John Schorne (died 1314) for curing gout, toothache and ague.  See British Listed Buildings and The Schorne Team Website for details of the church.
  • Holy well. Sir John was famous for miraculously bringing forth a spring of water during a drought, the waters of which were later considered to have healing properties. The holy well still stands close by the church, more information can be found here. Sir John is also reputed to have captured the devil in a boot, producing the boot during sermons and giving parishioners a quick look at the trapped devil. This is believed by some to be the origin of the Jack-in-a-box toy. Please see Wikipedia for information on Sir John and an image of the restored holy well, Museum of London for some medieval Sir John Schorne pilgrim badges.  Modern pilgrim badges and booklet available here.    Sir John’s relics were translated to Saint George’s Chapel in Windsor in 1478, although pilgrims still came to North Marston for healing.   See the entry for Windsor under the Also of Interest section in Berkshire for more details.
  • John Schorne Peregrination. A 27-mile walk around the North Marston area, see LDWA website for details.

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Cambridgeshire (including Huntingdonshire)

Cambridge, Church of Saint James.   Modern.    Information can be found at Church Website.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information would be helpful.

Croxton, Church of Saint James.   13th century, probably on site of Saxon church.  16th and 17th century additions. Saint James depicted in Kempe window (shell, staff, gourd and book). Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.  Images of church here and of window here. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information would be helpful.

Denny Abbey, Priory Church of Saint James and Saint Leonard.   Founded 1159, this was a Benedictine house for 10 years, then became a Knights Templar retirement house for aged members of the order.  After suppression of the Templars Denny became a Franciscan convent with the original church being converted into apartments for the Countess of Pembroke.  These apartments, along with the refectory, are the only parts to survive the Dissolution.  There is a wealth of Information online: general information can be found at Wikipedia, English Heritage and Denny Farmland Museum. Information and images of the apartments can be found at British Listed Buildings and information and images of the refectory can be found at British Listed Buildings.  CSJ also holds a guidebook by J G Coad.

Diddington, Church of Saint Laurence.   13th century, with 16th century additions. Head of Saint James (pilgrim hat with shell) depicted in 15th -17th century window (glass was reassembled in 1940s). Information and pictures of church can be found at British Listed Buildings and Village Website.  Image of window here. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, a good quality digital image of the glass would be helpful.

Earith, Chapel of Saint James, now demolished.    Information can be found at British History Online and Huntingdon Family History Society.  Earith was once a busy inland port and had various cattle fairs, including one on 25th July.  There was also a Chapel and Hermitage of Saint Mary and hermits were employed to maintain the local bridge and causeways in medieval times.  It would seem that both Chapels fell into disuse in the late 16th century and both have disappeared.  The CSJ does not have information on the exact location of the Chapel of Saint James and more information would be helpful.

Hemingford Grey, Church of Saint James.   1160, many subsequent alterations, spire blown down 1741, full restoration 1859, further refurbishment 2013. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.  Images of church on Geograph.org. CSJ holds two leaflet guides for this church.

Hinchingbrooke House, built on site of Priory of Saint James without Huntingdon, also known as Hinchingbrooke Priory.   There is some uncertainty about the origins of this small Benedictine convent (described as Augustinian by some).  The priory itself claimed that it was founded by William the Conqueror, John Leland recorded that it was set up when the convent at nearby Eltisley was destroyed, necessitating the nuns to move to the Hinchingbrooke site.  The priory was dissolved in 1536 after the last prioress died and the property passed into the ownership of Richard Williams alias Cromwell, one of the Visitors responsible for implementing the Dissolution and nephew of Thomas Cromwell, the architect of the Dissolution.  A grand Elizabethan house was constructed on the site, leaving very little of the original monastic buildings, and it was here that Oliver Cromwell was born.  The house eventually passed out of the Cromwell family, becoming the seat of the Earl of Sandwich. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online here and here, Ramsey Abbey website, and Huntingdon Town Info.  Information and images of Hinchingbrooke house can be found at the hinchhouse.org and hhpac.co.uk website.

Little Paxton, Church of Saint James.   12th century with 14th century tower.   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and photographs at the Church Website.  A very good illustrated guide is available on the Village Website. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information on any depictions of Saint James would be helpful.

Little Raveley, Church of Saint James.   Originally a chapelry dependent on Wistow and first mentioned in 1178.  13th century chancel with 14th century nave, converted to a house around 1980. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online photographs at Peter Robins’ Website and Zoopla   No known depictions of Saint James. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Lode, Church of Saint James.  Built in 19th century by Rev’d Hailstone who lived at Anglesey Abbey (local country house built on old priory site) and who was vicar of nearby Bottisham.  Fairhaven Chapel added in 20th century.   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and photographs at the Parish Website.   No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information on any depictions of Saint James would be helpful.

Newton in the Isle, Church of Saint James, formerly dedicated to Saint Katherine.   13th century with later alterations, although it is speculated that the nave pillars are Norman and could be the remains of an earlier, possibly flood-damaged church which had be be rebuilt.   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and photographs at Druidic.org. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ holds a very informative well-illustrated booklet for this church.

Newton, Church of Saint Margaret, formerly dedicated to Saint James.  Mainly 13th century with 14th and 15th century additions and 19th and 20th century restorations.  The dedication had changed by the 18th century, and may be connected with a bequest to build a chapel of Saint Margaret in the church in 1522.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online, image at Geograph.org. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information on any depictions of Saint James would be helpful.

Spaldwick, Church of Saint James.  Late 12th century, 14th century chancel and tower.  Church restored and spire rebuilt in 19th century.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and  on the Village Website with a very nice photo montage.  Another similar montage is here on another page at the Village Website.   No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ holds a copy of St James the Great Spaldwick A History and Guide to the Church by Stuart Dixon.

Stretham, Church of Saint James.   14th century with substantial 19th C remodelling.   Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia.  Further information on British History Online. No known depictions of Saint James but there is a stained glass window of Pilgrim’s Progress by Comper.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information on any depictions of Saint James would be helpful.

Waresley, Church of Saint James, previously dedicated to Saint Andrew.   It is not known when the change occurred, but probably after the Reformation. The medieval church was destroyed by a storm in 1724 and rebuilt in 1728. This building is a 19th C replacement on a different site, in the centre of the village.   Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information on any images of Saint James would be useful.

Wimpole, Church of Saint Andrew. 14th century north chapel (remainder of church is 18th century) has a medieval stained glass window depicting a pilgrim. This figure is often identified as William de Ufford because his coat of arms features in the window. Information on church can be found at British Listed Buildings and on William de Ufford (and close up detail of window) on Wikipedia. Image of whole window on Flickr. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

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Cheshire

Many thanks to Ann Clark and Michael Dickinson for their respective work in the 1990’s on Cheshire and the historic counties of Lancashire.  Where possible their notes have been retained on our files.

Audlem

  • Church of Saint James.   On a circular mound, reputed to be a pagan burial site and/or site of a Saxon church. This building dates from 13th century with later additions including 19th and 20th century restorations.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings (images too) and church website.  A medieval seal, believed to be that of Richard Randolph, vicar of Audlem, was found at Lichfield, details here.  CSJ holds a Visitors Notes pamphlet for this church, images, especially of interior, would be helpful.
  • Fair of James the Apostle, by charter 1295, ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Cheshire 2010

Burton, Fair of James the Apostle, by charter 1299, ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Cheshire 2010

Chester

  • Appears to have had two hermitages of Saint James, please see British History Online for details of both.
    • one near to Saint John the Baptist’s Church, to which it belonged until the Reformation, and seemingly connected with a Chapel of Saint James also in the precincts of Saint John’s.  The chapel has gone but this site still has a 14th century anchorite’s cell, now a cottage, which is thought to be the hermitage of Saint James.  There is a fascinating legend from Gerald of Wales that King Harold did not die at Hastings, but escaped with many wounds including the loss of an eye and lived out his days as a hermit in the cell of Saint James in Chester beside Saint John’s church. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Cheshire Now (also images here). CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this building, more information would be helpful.
    • one at Handbridge, on the south bank of the Dee, no trace now remains of the building. This hermitage crops up in various official records, the occupants obtaining grants of various sorts or coming to the attention of the authorities for misdemeanours; in the 15th century one hermit of Saint James was accused of receiving robbers, sheltering malefactors and keeping a brothel!
  • Cathedral Church of Christ & the Blessed Virgin Mary, has an early 20th century stained glass window of Saint James in the east range of the cloister.  General information on the cathedral at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia, image of window here.

Christleton, Church of Saint James.   Believed to be on the site of an early Roman church (the circular churchyard and the place name all point to an early origin) all that remains of the medieval church is 15th century tower. The nave and chancel were rebuilt in 1736 and again in 1876.  There is a stained glass window of Saint James with pilgrim hat with shell, book and staff with gourd, possibly by Kempe. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and there is a very good guide and images of the church and window on the village website.

Congleton, Church of Saint James.   19th century, no known depictions of Saint James.  Information on this church is very limited and more details would be welcomed.  An image can be found at Geograph.org.

Gawsworth, Church of Saint James.   Norman church replaced by 15th century nave and tower.   There is a stained glass window of Saint James with book and staff with gourd which can be seen in detail on Flickr. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings  (also images) and on the village website. We do not have an image of the window and a good digital image would be much appreciated.

Grappenhall, Church of Saint James.    Norman church with 14th century Boydell Chapel and major alterations/restoration in 16th and 19th centuries. There is a stained glass window of Saint James with pilgrim hat with shell in the Boydell Chapel. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and on the church website.  We do not have an image of the window and a good digital image would be much appreciated.

Ince, Church of Saint James.   Norman church replaced by later church, 15th century tower and part of chancel, remainder of church rebuilt in 1854.   No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and on Wikipedia.   Further information and/or images would be welcome.

Latchford (Warrington), Church of Saint James.   Founded 1777, present building dates from 1829.   No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.   Further information and/or images would be welcome.

Marton, Church of Saint James and Saint Paul.   Founded 1343, later alterations and 19th century restorations.   A very attractive timber-framed building. No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.   Further information and/or images would be welcome.

Sutton Lane Ends (Macclesfield), Church of Saint James.   19th century . Various depictions reported of Saint James but we have no images. Church Website unfortunately gives no history of building and we have not traced whether it is listed.    Further information and/or images would be very welcome.

Warrington, Church of Saint James.   Modern. We have very little information on this church, save what is available on the Church Website. Further information and/or images would be very useful.

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Cornwall

There is much work still to do on Cornwall; many entries remain listed as Places of Interest as their connection with Saint James or pilgrimage has not yet been verified.  There is also a lot more information to gather on Cornish pilgrim ports and routes, the CSJ holds various detailed notes which could benefit from organising and updating, and more in-depth research on the history of the individual ports would be helpful.   Please contact Ruth Abrahams if you would like to get involved with developing this section or can provide information or images for any of the entries below, or have noticed any errors or omissions.

Antony, Church of Saint James.   Re-dedicated 1259, previous dedication may have been to Saint Anthony, 14th century tower, 15th century aisles and 19th century roof.   Pulpit depicting four Evangelists from c.1500 may be Spanish. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Cornish Churches.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information would be helpful, particularly on re-dedication.

Bellasize, Chapel of Saint James (now disappeared), site thought to be called Chapel or Chapel Hayes (chapel of ease?).   Information can be found at GENUKI and Cornwall Online Census Project (Folio 19 Page 12 relating to possible location at Chapel Hayes).  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this chapel site, more information would be really helpful.

Boscastle

  • Chapel of Saint James (pre-1400, fell into disrepair in 19th century, now disappeared).  May have been the chapel for Botreaux Castle as it was nearby and built at a similar time. The site is not known for definite but was to north west of market area and it may have stood where the Mission Chapel (now the village hall) was subsequently built on the corner of Fore Street and Gunpool Lane.  Information can be found at Cornwall OPC PDF, North Cornwall District Council PDF and iwalkcornwall map.  CSJ holds some copy information for this chapel site, but more information would be helpful.
  • Fair of James the Apostle, royal charter granted in 1321 to William son of William de Botereux to hold a fair at the manor. Information can be found at the Gazeteer of Markets and Fairs.

Fowey, pilgrim port.  Not mentioned in Domesday Book.  The nearby priory of Tywardreath was founded around the time of the Conquest and seems to have been the reason that foreign trade started at Fowey.   By 1190 the port was busy enough to be granted a Town Charter, and by 1400 the Water of Fowey had become so silted that the port activities at Lostwithiel had been moved downstream to Fowey.  Various pilgrim licences were granted to ship owners to sail from the Water of Fowey and No. 9 South Street has been suggested as a possible pilgrim hostel since it is a medieval hall with an upper chamber with two garderobes. It was believed to have been owned and managed by the priory of Tywardreath.   The CSJ holds some notes on Fowey by Bredereth Sen Jago, the Cornish Pilgrims of Saint James.

Golant

  • Church of Saint Sampson.   Established 1281 as chapel of Tywardreath Priory, rebuilt 15th century with 19th century restoration.   Saint James is reported depicted in a wooden carving and also in a fragment of medieval stained glass. Information and images of church can be found at British Listed Buildings and Parish Website.   A possible image of the wood carving (pulpit made of bench ends) can be seen at Wikimedia Commons (Saint James is the figure on right?).  No image available of window available.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information/images would be really useful to assist with a positive identification of the figure on the pulpit and on the reported glass.
  • Guild of Saint James mentioned in Bredereth Sen Jago papers, CSJ holds no further details, more information please.

Goldsithney

  • Chapel of Saint James, built by John Andrew in 1400, disappeared in 18th century, granite figure of Saint James above south door of Saint Michael and Saint Piran’s in Perranuthnoe is from this chapel
  • Fair of Saint James outside the Mount. May date back to 1140, but first recorded as a Fair of Saint James in early 13th century.  Information can be found at Gazeteer of Markets and Fairs.

Jacobstow

Kilkhampton, Church of Saint James.  12th century inner south door, remainder of church 15th and 16th century except for east end which was rebuilt in 19th century.   Saint James depicted in stained glass window on north side of church (pilgrim hat with shell, staff with gourd and book) and there is a small stone figure of Saint James with pilgrim hat, staff and book in exterior niche above door on south wall. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Stratton Deanery website, just images at Cornish Churches and SJITBI Flickr Group.   CSJ holds a 2012 guidebook for this church.

Lanteglos-by-Camelford, Church of Saint Julitta.   Norman origin with 14th/15th century tower and south aisle and 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in medieval stained glass.  Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings and Historic Cornwall, images of the church at Cornish Churches and of the window at Cornish Stained Glass.

Leedstown, Church of Saint James. 19th century, built to serve new mining village.  Currently up for sale with a view to conversion to a private house – see here.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at Visitor UK, images at Cornish Churches.

Perranuthnoe, Church of Saint Piran and Saint Nicholas.   Norman origin, mainly rebuilt 1470 with 19th century restoration.  Granite figure of Saint James over south door, believed to have come from the now disappeared Chapel of Saint James at Goldsithney.  Information about the church can be found at Perranuthnoe Church History.  The CSJ does not have an image of the granite figure, a good quality digital image would be very helpful.

St Kew, Church of Saint James (dedicated to Saint Kew until 19th century).   6th century Celtic origins, this building 15th century with 19th century restoration.  19th century stained glass window of Saint James, also some very fine medieval glass.  Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings and Cornish Historic Churches Trust.   An image of the Saint James window would be very helpful.  CSJ holds a guide leaflet and a postcard of the church.

St Levan, Church of Saint Levan.   13/14/15th century with 19th century restoration.  15th or early 16th century wooden bench end carving of Saint James (pilgrim hat with shell, staff and book).  Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings, Church Website and Cornish Historic Churches Trust (also image of bench end here).

St Mawgan

  • Church of Saint Mawgan.   13th century with 15th century additions and two 19th century restorations, the earlier by W. Butterfield.  Saint James is depicted in two stained glass windows which can be seen in Steve Day’s photos on Flickr here and here. Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings.    Since the rededication of the church in 1861 on Saint James’ Day there has been an annual Feast Sports Day held on the Wednesday nearest to 25th July.  Information on Mawgan Porth website.
  • Well of Saint James. This is dressed every year on Saint James’ Day.  Information on Mawgan Porth website, short video of a visit to the well on YouTube and various pictures of the well blessing in 2011 on the cornwall-photos.com website.
  • Lanherne Manor House (now a convent) is reported to have scallop shell decoration on the exterior.  The building dates from the early 16th century with later additions. Information about and images of the building can be found at British Listed Buildings.  More information/images of any Saint James/pilgrim-related decoration would be appreciated.

St Neot, Church of Saint Neot or Saint Anietus.   135h century with 19th century restoration.  Saint James is depicted in 15th century stained glass window (pilgrim hat, staff and rosary).  The Noah window contains interesting images of medieval ships. Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings.   Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Sheviock, Fair of Saint James granted 1314, to be held at the manor.  See history.ac.uk for details.

Torpoint, Church of Saint James, 1817 Chapel of Ease for Antony Parish, became parish in its own right 1819.  Built to serve workers at the growing Plymouth Dock. No known depictions of Saint James  Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.

Tregony, Church of Saint James, founded 11th century but abandoned in 16th century due to flooding by River Fal, valuables moved to church in Cuby.  No trace of the church now remains. There was also a Fair of Saint James granted to the local lord in 1227.  Information about the church can be found at Wikipedia and about the Fair at history.ac.uk.

Tregowris, Chapel of Saint James, now disappeared. Mentioned some time between 1461-83 as a place of pilgrimage, see British History Online for details.

Treslothan, Chapel of Saint James, now disappeared. Mentioned in the Camborne Parish Church churchwardens’ account books for 1535-1657, see Camborne Old Cornwall Society for details.

Truro, Cathedral Church of Saint Mary,founded 1259, this building 1880-1910, incorporating 16th century south aisle of old parish church.  Saint James is depicted in stained glass window and in stone reredos  Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings and Cathedral Website.   Information about reredos here and about window here. The CSJ holds some guides for the cathedral.  Images of cathedral, window and reredos at SJITBI Flickr group.  CSJ holds a guide booklet for the cathedral.

Also of interest:

Budock Water, Church of Saint Budock.   13th/15th century with 19th century restoration.  Late medieval base of rood screen with painted panel, one of which is said to be Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Parish Website.  Available images do not allow a definite identification, more information and good quality images would be very welcome.

Cullacott Farm, late medieval hall farmhouse.  Wall paintings date from c.1500, one of which is said to depict Saint James.  Information on building can be found at British Listed Buildings and Cullacott Farm Website.  Available images do not allow a definite identification, more information and good quality images would be very welcome.  The building is now split into two properties and used as holiday lets, no known other access to the public.

Gunwalloe, Church of Saint Winwaloe.   13th century, almost completely rebuilt late 15th/early 16th centuries, 19th century restoration.  Saint James reported depicted in painted oak panel from rood screen, which has been cut up and made into doors. Legend has it that the wood came from the wreck of the St Anthony, a treasure ship belonging to the King of Portugal, which foundered just off Gunwalloe in 1527. Information and images (although not of the panels) can be found at British Listed Buildings, Cornwall Historic Churches Trust and Cornish Churches.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information would be helpful, more information/images would be really useful to assist with a positive identification of the figure.

Launceston, Chapel of Saint James, now disappeared.  Possibly Saint James the Less as there was a Fair of Saint Philip and Saint James the Less. Mentioned in Launceston charters according to British History Online.  More information would be appreciated to confirm the dedication.

Linkinhorne, Church of Saint Melor.   Late 15th century,19th century restoration.  15th century wall paintings depict almsgivers in Seven Works of Mercy who may have scallop shells on their satchels.  Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings and images of the paintings at Painted Church.  We would appreciate a good quality image of the paintings.

Ludgvan, Chapel of Saint Thomas, now disappeared, believed have been sited at Collurian and associated with a local Holy Well of the same name (the Ludgvan Holy Well seems to have been at a different location and has now disappeared).  An article in a Bredereth Sen Jago newsletter indicates that prayers for Saint James were said here but as yet we cannot discover the original source for this.  More information please!

Mawnan Smith, Church of Saint Mawnan.   13/14/15th century with 19th century restoration.  An image of Saint James is reported painted on a fragment of a medieval rood screen but no pictures are available to conform this  Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings , Parish Council website and Falmouth Fine Arts and Decorative Society.  We would appreciate a good quality image of the screen.

Morwenstow, St James Cross area.  The addition of “St” seems to have occurred during or after 19th century.  More information would be very helpful.

St Cleer, Church of Saint Clarus.   Norman origins (possibly earlier), 15th century with 19th century restoration.  An altar of Saint James is reported in the church in 1440, although there is no trace now.  Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings.  More information about the altar and source of evidence for this would be helpful.

St Michael’s Mount, Church of Saint Michael.   1135 origin, mainly 14th century with 15th century additions and 19th century remodelling. A depiction of Saint James is reported in a 15th century alabaster panel.  Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings.  No image is available, more information/images would assist with a positive identification of the figure.

Trevalga, Chapel of Saint James has been mentioned here by Bredereth Sen Jago.  Any information regarding the source evidence for this would be very helpful.

 

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County Durham

Burnopfield, Church of Saint James. 19th century, new parish created to serve increasing population of mineworkers.  No known images of Saint James.  Basic information and images can be found at Church Website and information about village at Wikipedia. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Castle Eden, Church of Saint James. Founded in 11th or 12th century, rebuilt in 18th century.  No known images of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, information at Castle Eden Society and Diocese of Durham. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Coundon, Church of Saint James. 19th century, new parish created to serve increasing population of mineworkers.  This 1870s building replaced a smaller church of the 1840s. No known images of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information at durhamintime.org website and image at Geograph.org. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Darlington, Church of Saint James the Great. 19th century, became a parish in its own right in 1970s.  No known images of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Church Website. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Durham

  • Chapel of Saint James on western end of Elvet Bridge, established in the 12th century (replaced by gaol in 17th century).  See Wikipedia and British History Online for information.
  • Chantry chapel of Saint James. This was one of four chantry chapels contained within the 12th century parish church of Saint Nicholas and was established in 1382 for the souls of the de Cockside family.  The church was pulled down and replaced in the 19th century so no trace of the chapel remains.  See GENUKI and British History Online for information.
  • The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham was established in 995 to house the relics of Saint Cuthbert and quickly became a site of pilgrimage.  Other relics which were acquired by Durham include the head of Saint Oswald of Northumbria and the body of the Venerable Bede.   The current building dates from the 11th century.  See Wikipedia and Durham Cathedral Website for details.

Hamsterley, Church of Saint James. Founded c.1180 as a chapel of ease for Saint Andrew’s Auckland.  This building is mainly 13th century with a 19th century restoration.  No known images of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Village Website and keystothepast.info. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Hunstanworth, Church of Saint James. Medieval origin, rebuilt in the 18th century and again in the 19th century.  Saint James depicted as pilgrim in stained glass, see SJITBI Flickr group for image.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and keystothepast.info. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Thorpe Thewles, Church of Saint James. Late 19th century, replaced the mid-19th century Church of the Holy Trinity, which in turn was built to replace the now ruined Church of Saint Thomas of Canterbury.  No known images of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, information at British History Online and picture at Geograph.org. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Also of interest:

Stockton-on-Tees.  Possibly two Churches of Saint James existed here, one very modern to serve the new housing estate in Hardwick – see here –  and one built in the 19th century on Portrack Lane, according to British History Online.  More information please!

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Cumbria

Many thanks to Michael Dickinson for his work in the 1990’s on the historic counties of Lancashire.  Where possible his notes have been retained on our files.  And many thanks also to Bryan Hackett who discovered several places – including Cartmel, Great Urswick and Hawkshead – that were missing from this list, and took many of the Cumbrian pictures on the SJITBI Flickr group.

Arnside, Church of Saint James.   Built 1864-66 century, with further 19th and 20th century additions.  Saint James depicted in modern mosaic. Information can be found at Wikipedia, Diocese Website and VisitCumbria.  Images can be seen on SJITBI Flickr group.

Barrow-in-Furness, Church of Saint James.   Built 19th century by Paley and Austin to serve increasing population of iron and steelworkers, seriously damaged in 1941 air raid, destroying most of the stained glass.  Saint James depicted in two stained glass windows, and on banner (images can be seen on SJITBI Flickr group). Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Barrow Team Ministry website has information on history, description and plan of building and image gallery.  The bells have recently been refurbished – details of the restoration appeal here.

Burton-in-Kendal, Church of Saint James.   12th century origins with later medieval additions and 19th century restoration by Paley and Austin.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wikipedia and images at Cumbrian Churches blog and an image of the exterior at SJITBI Flickr Group.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Beetham, Saint Michael and All Angels. 12th century origins with later medieval additions and 19th century additions/restoration. Saint James depicted in 19th century window with book and staff with gourd.   See Visit Cumbria and Church Website for details, SJITBI Flickr group for image of window.

Buttermere, Church of Saint James.   1840 with 1930s restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. Contains memorial to Wainwright. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and at VisitCumbria.  CSJ holds two photographs for this church and there are various photographs in the SJITBI Flickr group.

Carlisle

  • Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, built 11th/12th century to replace church sacked by Danes 200 years earlier.  Saint James is depicted (pilgrim hat with shell, staff, bag and book) on a painted panel of the Apostles from late 15th century, and the ceiling of the Prior’s Room has scallop shell decoration. Information about the cathedral can be found at British Listed Buildings and the cathedral website.  The CSJ holds a postcard of the Apostle Panel, and there are two photographs on the SJITBI Flickr group – we should also be very grateful for a good digital image of the Prior’s Room ceiling to be added to the Flickr group.
  • Church of Saint James.   19th century.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and image at VisitCumbria.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Cartmel, Priory Church of Saint Mary & St Michael.  Founded late 12th century. Saint James depicted in stained glass in tracery (hat with shell, staff with gourd).  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Priory Website and a good gallery of stained glass images at Cumbrian Churches blog.  There are also images at SJITBI Flickr group.

Cummersdale, Church of Saint James.   Daughter church of Carlisle Saint James.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at Church Website and at VisitCumbria.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Great Ormside, Church of Saint James.   Site had a Viking burial where sword and Saxon bowl were discovered.  This building dates from late 11th century with 12th and 14th century additions and 19th century repairs.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia and a very good gallery of images at Cumbrian Churches blog.  CSJ holds one photographs of this church.

Great Urswick, Church of Saint Mary and Saint Michael, this building dates from 13th century, although likely that a church was here much earlier. Saint James is depicted on the 1910 reredos by Alec Miller (hat with shell, staff) There are various scallop shells decorating other wooden furnishings like the font lid and sounding board.  See British Listed Buildings, VisitCumbria, Wikipedia and Church Website for details.  There are also images at SJITBI Flickr group.

Hawkshead, Church of Saint Michael and All Angels, this building late 14th or early 15th century.  A chapel of Saint James was established in 1965 when the organ was moved.  There are various symbols associated with Saint James (scallop shell) or walkers (boots, rucksacks, sticks, water bottles). embroidered on the kneelers.  See British Listed Buildings, Wikipedia and Benefice Website for details.  There are also images at SJITBI Flickr group.

Hutton-in-the-Forest, Church of Saint James.   Medieval church, substantially rebuilt 1714 with 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and images at Old Cumbria Gazeteer.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Ireby, Church of Saint James.   Built 1845-6 to replace Ireby Old Church as this was deemed too remote from village.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at VisitCumbria.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.   Was Ireby Old Church (1170, only chancel remains, now redundant) also dedicated to Saint James?  Any information would be helpful. Information and images for the Old Church can be found at British Listed BuildingsBritain Express and Visit Cumbria.  It is worth a visit in its own right even if it does have no connection to Saint James.

Long Marton, Church of Saint Margaret and Saint James, the history of the joint dedication is unclear, sometimes the church is referred to as Saint Margaret’s, sometimes as Saint James’. 14th century evidence indicates solely Saint Margaret. The nave is Saxon in origin, with a 12th century tower and chancel, some 15th and 16th century additions and a 19th century restoration. Saint James is depicted in a 1930s Stanley Scott window. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wikipedia and British History Online.   An image of the window can be seen at Dave Webster’s Flickr page.   CSJ holds a photograph of the exterior of the church.   Further information on dedication and good quality digital image of window for CSJ records would be very helpful.

Millom, RC Church of Our Lady and Saint James, founded 1867 to serve Irish miners, this building 1888. Is this James the Greater or Lesser? Information can be found at Parish Website.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Ravenglass

Staveley, Church of Saint James.   This building 1865, replacing 1338 Church of Saint Margaret.  Saint James depicted in Morris & Co window.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and a very good mix of information and images (including window) at David Hall Lake District Walks.  CSJ does not hold any additional information, images of the window can be seem on the SJITBI Flickr group here and here.

Tebay, Church of Saint James.   Built 1880 to serve increasing population due to railway junction at Tebay.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, VisitCumbria, and at Orton and Tebay Local History Society here for history and here for stained glass. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Temple Sowerby, Church of Saint James.   Medieval chapel of ease for Church of Saint Michael in Kirkby-Thore, rebuilt 1770 and restored in 19th century.  Manor was held by Knights Templar.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at Steve Bulman’s website, Cumbria County History and images at VisitCumbria. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more would be welcome on history of medieval chapel, also images.

Uldale, Church of Saint James.  c.1150, enlarged 1730 and 1837 and restored early 20th century.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at Church Website, British Listed Buildings and images at VisitCumbria. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Welton, Church of Saint James.  1873, built as a chapel of ease for Church of Saint Mary in Sebergham.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at Parish website and images at VisitCumbria. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Whitehaven

  • Church of Saint James.  1750s, a very fine example of Georgian church architecture.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at Wikipedia and church website has information on history here and a virtual tour here.  See SJITBI Flickr group for images.
  • Saint Nicholas Centre.  Church in existence here from 1640s, rebuilt 1693, then again 1883, then all but tower destroyed by fire in 1971. The church reopened as a chapel and cafe and is part of Saint James’ parish.  See Centre website and British Listed Buildings for details.  Saint James depicted in modern stained glass (staff with shell) – see image on SJITBI Flickr group.

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Derbyshire

Derbyshire is an area famous for well dressing, where a bright picture is made from (usually) natural materials to decorate the well.  It is usually a summer activity and various villages decorate wells on and around Saint James’ Day.  It appears to be an ancient folk tradition that has been considerably revived from Victorian times onwards but any information on connections with Saint James would be appreciated. General information can be found on Welldressing.com and the 2015 timetable for well dressing is here on the same website.

Barlborough, Church of Saint James.   12/14th century with 19th century additions.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings,Church Website and Diocese Website.   CSJ holds a guide leaflet for this church.  There is well dressing in late July.

Bonsall, Church of Saint James.   13/14th century with  major 19th century rebuild/restoration.  Reputed to have the highest chancel in England.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at The Andrews Pages Picture Gallery and Diocese Website.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.   At least three wells are dressed each year in Bonsall in late July, last year it was six, including one called Saint James’ Church Well.  Information can be found here at Welldressing.com and there is a video on YouTube.

Brassington, Church of Saint James.   12/14th century with 19th century additions/restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James, some scallop decoration on 12th century stone capitals, this may be more decorative than symbolic. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, Village Website, English Church Architecture and Diocese Website.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Buxworth, Church of Saint James.   1874.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Diocese Website.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Codnor, Church of Saint James.   1874, with chancel added 1888-90.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, Village website and Diocese Website.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Derby

  • Priory of Saint James (no trace exists).  There was a Chapel of Saint James of Saxon origin which was donated to the Cluniac Priory of Bermondsey in 11th century.  The Priory had a hospital for the poor in 13th century.  After Dissolution in 1536 its lands were given to the Corporation of Derby.  Information can be found at British History Online and Wikipedia.
  • Fair of Saint James, first recorded 1229, rights held by the burgesses of Derby  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Derbyshire 2007
  • Church of Saint James (deconsecrated and now used as a climbing centre).   1866 and 1875.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Alter Rock Website.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Edlaston, Church of Saint James.   Originally a chapelry of Ashbourne, it became a church in its own right around 1300.  This building is mainly 14th century with 17th and 19th century additions.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and a image at DerbyshireUK.net   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Glossop, Church of Saint James.   1844-6.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Riddings, Church of Saint James.   1820s/30s, north/south orientation.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Wikipedia and Diocese Website.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Shardlow, Church of Saint James.   1838.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, images at Parish Website.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Smisby, Church of Saint James.   Recorded in 1068 as a chapel of ease, built by the monks of Repton.  The current building dates from 13th century with additions from most centuries up until 19th century. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Swarkestone, Church of Saint James.   12th/16th century with substantial 19th century rebuild. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Taxal, Church of Saint James.   Possibly Saxon origins, church was known to have been on this site from mid-13th century.  Most of church 16/17th century with substantial 19th century rebuild. No known depictions of Saint James, although scallop shells feature in the stained glass. Church has a monument to Roger Jaudrell who fought at Agincourt.  Information can be found at Parish Website and information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.    Church was previously dedicated to Saint Leonard, and was changed to Saint James in the 17th century – see FamilySearch.org.  CSJ does not hold any additional information, images can be seen at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Temple Normanton, Church of Saint James.   Chapel has been here since 12th century when the manor was held by the Knights Templar.  It was rebuilt in 1623 and again in 1882 but the church suffered from subsidence and was replaced with a lighter wooden building in 1922.  This was damaged by high winds and replaced with a striking hangar-like fibreglass building in 1986. No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at GENUKI and information and image can be found at Diocese Website.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more on the earlier buildings would be welcome.

Woodhead, Church of Saint James.   Founded 1487 as chantry chapel and possibly originally dedicated to the Blessed Virgin.  Present building dates from mid-18th century. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, HistoryHome.co.uk and Geocaching.com    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information on change of dedication would be useful.

 

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Devon

We particularly would like information on the ports where medieval pilgrims embarked for Spain, and also on the routes such pilgrims may have taken across Devon to reach those ports.   The CSJ does hold various material on ports and routes which needs much more work, please contact Ruth Abrahams if you would like to get involved with developing this section or can provide information or images for any of the entries below, or have noticed any errors or omissions.  Many thanks to Joanne Land and others for their original work on this county.

Abbots Bickington, Church of Saint James.   Norman origin, built c.1300 with 1868 restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Images can be found at SJITBI Flickr Group.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Alfington, Church of Saint James and Saint Anne.   19th century by Butterfield.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Image by Fiona Moate can be viewed at Flickr.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, a good quality digital image would be very helpful.

Arlington, Church of Saint James.   15th/16th century tower, rest of church rebuilt 1844.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Images by Mark Collins can be viewed here.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information about the date of the tower, images of the church etc, welcome.

Ashreigney, Church of Saint James.   Possible Norman origin, mainly 15th century with 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted as pilgrim in modern stained glass (shell, staff, hat, book and bag). Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Images can be found at Parish Website and SJITBI Flickr Group.

Avonwick, Church of Saint James.   Proprietary chapel, built 19th century.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at Community Website and Cornish Surname website.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Barnstaple, Chapel of Saint Anne, originally a chantry chapel, then a grammar school, now a museum.  Believed to be early 14th century but no evidence before 15th century, 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James, it is thought that a chantry chapel of Saint James existed on same site. Information can be found at British History Online, information and images at British Listed Buildings, Barnstaple Town Council website, Barnstaple Town Council Conservation Management Plan and a few more images at  SJITBI Flickr Group.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Bere Ferrers, Church of Saint Andrew.  Believed to have Saxon origins, the present building dates from c.1330, 19th century restoration.  Pilgrim or Saint James depicted in medieval stained glass window (hat, bag, possibly book). It is also conjectured that a room above the porch could have been used as a pilgrim dormitory but there is no evidence for this that we are aware of. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Bere Anglicans website, and an image of the window at Rex Harris’ Flickr page and at The Rose Window.   CSJ holds various guidebooks/postcards/leaflets for this church and surrounding area.  A good quality digital image of the window would be appreciated on the Saint James in the British Isles Flickr Group.

Bishopsteignton, Fair of Saint James, 1256 by charter ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Devon 2010

Bondleigh, Church of Saint James.   12th century, rebuilt 15th and 16th century with 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Images of church at Pictures of England and SJITBI Flickr Group.

Bridgetown, Fair of Saint James, 1267 by charter ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Devon 2010. There is a possibility that a shrine of Saint James may have existed here, please also see entry for Totnes in “Also of Interest” at the foot of this section.

Chawleigh, Church of Saint James.   15th/16th century with substantial 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and image of church exterior can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Image of interior at Geograph.org.  Further images at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Chivelstone, Church of Saint Sylvester.  15th century, 19/20th century restoration.  Saint James (pilgrim hat, staff and book) is depicted on a medieval painted wood screen.  Information about church at British Listed Buildings,  multiple images of church at Flickriver.com, b/w image of relevant part of screen at Trinity College Dublin Access to Research Archive.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, a good quality digital colour image of the Saint James figure would be very useful.

Christow, Church of Saint James.   12th century font, mainly 15th century with 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and image of church exterior can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Image of exterior at Geograph.org and interior at Church Website.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Cockington, Church of Saint George and Saint Mary. 13th century origins, mainly 14/15th century, 19/20th century restorations.  Saint James (or a pilgrim) is reported depicted in stained glass  although we do not have an image of the window to verify this – see “Some Old Devon Churches” by John Stabb for details.  Information about church at British Listed Buildings,   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, an image of the Saint James figure would be very useful.

Combeinteignhead, Church of All Saints.   12th century font, 13/15th century building with two 19th century restorations.  Saint James depicted in a wooden bench end carving – see “Some Old Devon Churches” by John Stabb. There are also scallop shells decorating the Hockmore Tomb although their significance is unknown.  Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, an image of the Saint James figure would be very useful.

Doddiscombsleigh, Church of Saint Michael.   Believed to have Saxon origins, this building is mainly 15th century with 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in medieval glass (hat, staff, book, shell decoration on robe) – see information and images at demolition-exeter blog and Vidimus Website.   Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, a good detailed image of the Saint James figure would be very useful.

Exeter

• Church of Saint James, parish created in 1838 when Saint Sidwell’s parish was divided. Church destroyed in 1942 air raid and rebuilt in 1956.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images of 1956 church can be found on the Church Website and a picture of the 1838 church can be viewed on the Exeter Memories Website.

• Cathedral Church of Saint Peter:

  • Chapel of Saint James, medieval chapel which was destroyed in 1942 air raid, see Exeter Memories Website for images of the blitz destruction.  The chapel and cathedral were restored after the war, see here for images of the restored chapel.  Saint James depicted on altar cloth  – see SJITBI Flickr group.
  • Carving of Saint James on image screen, west front of cathedral.  See here for various detailed images, including Saint James.

Great Torrington

  • Chapel of Saint James, attached to Torrington Castle.  The first castle was destroyed in 1228 because it was built without a license, and was rebuilt in 1340.  Nothing now remains of the chapel, although some mounds indicate the site of the castle motte or keep, now flanked by a car park and bowling green.  The chapel may have been converted to a school house at some time and appears to have been demolished before 1780.  See GENUKI, Gatehouse Gazeteer and Town Website for details.
  • Church of Saint Michael and All Angels.   The building has 13/14th century parts, an explosion of gunpowder stored in the church in 1645 destroyed much of the church which was rebuilt in 1651. The tower and spire is 19th century.  Saint James Chapel was dedicated in 20th century, there is a painted figure of Saint James dressed as a pilgrim on the chapel reredos. Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and gallery of images at the Church Website.  There are also some images on SJITBI Flickr Group.

Halwill, Church of Saint Peter and Saint James.   14th century tower, remainder of church rebuilt 19th century.  Saint James depicted in stained glass window (staff with gourd, book). Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and image of church exterior can be found at Parish Website.   More information welcome, especially about the possible holy well from which the village may derive its name – see Parish Website for details of this theory. Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Hennock, Church of Saint Mary the Virgin. 15th century, 19th century restoration.  Saint James is reported depicted on the magnificent medieval rood screen, although we do not have an image of the actual panel – see Village Website for details.  Information about church at British Listed Buildings,   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, an image of the Saint James figure would be very useful.

Herner, Church of Saint James. 19th century chapel of ease for adjacent Hall Estate.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings although it is mistakenly identified as Saint John’s here.  Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.  Contact Hall Estate regarding access.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Holne, Church of Saint Mary the Virgin. c.1300 with 15th century additions, 19th century restoration.  Saint James is reported depicted on the recently-restored and very fine medieval rood screen, although we are unable to find an online image of the relevant panel.    Information about church at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Church Website, details of saints depicted at “Some Old Devon Churches” by John Stabb.  CSJ has a poor quality pre-restoration photo, an good digital image of the figure identified as Saint James would be very useful to assist us with verification.

Iddesleigh, Church of Saint James.   13th century origins, mainly 15th century, with 19th century rebuilding/restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James, scallop shells on heraldic shields in window. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Information and image at Parish Website.  Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Jacobstowe, Church of Saint James.   12th century origins, mainly 15th century, with early 20th century additions.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Image at Geograph.org and at SJITBI Flickr Group.  CSJ does not hold any additional information for this church.

Kings Nympton, Church of Saint James. 15th century, substantial 18th century rebuild.  No known depictions of Saint James. but well worth a visit for painted chancel ceiling and rood screen. Information can be found at British Listed BuildingsParish Website and Wikipedia.  Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Langford, Fair of Saint James, 1333 by charter ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Devon 2010

Lapford, Chapel of Saint James the Apostle, licensed for divine service in 1434 by Edmund Lacy, Bishop of Exeter.   A 15th century thatched chapel attached to a farm at Bury Barton is believed to be this very chapel.  See the Bishop’s Register for the licence details and British Listed Buildings for information.  Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Luffincott, Church of Saint James (now redundant). 15th century, with substantial 18th century rebuild.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at The Churches Conservation Trust Website.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Manaton, Church of Saint Winifred. 15th century, 19th and 20th century restorations.  Saint James (pilgrim hat and staff) depicted in stained glass window.  Is this the 15th century glass referred to in British Listed Buildings? More information on church at Village Website .  CSJ has a photograph of the window but a good quality digital image would be appreciated.

Marldon, Church of Saint John the Baptist. Tower built around 1400, remainder of church 15th century, 19th century restoration.  Saint James (pilgrim hat, bag, book, staff and water gourd) depicted in 19th century stained glass window.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, Village Website and Marldon Local History website, and an image of the window at Maljoe’s Flickr page.

Okehampton

  • Chapel of Saint James.  15th century chapel of ease, built because new town founded by Normans was some distance from Saxon settlement and the Church of All Saints. Severely damaged by fire in 19th century, all but the tower was rebuilt.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at Devon Council Website and British Listed Buildings.  Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.   CSJ does not hold any additional information for this church, we would welcome a copy of the article Story of the chapel of St James the Apostle at Okehampton by E H Young.
  • Fair of Saint James 1221, by charter  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Devon 2010

Parkham, Church of Saint James.  15th century, with 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Image at Geograph.org.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Sidbury, Church of Saint Giles and Saint Peter. Substantially Norman with 13th and 15th century additions and 19th century restoration.  Saint James is depicted in a 1905 window (pilgrim hat with shell, staff and gourd).   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.  Images of church at pastremains.co.uk and image of window at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Slapton, Church of Saint James.   13th century origins, later medieval additions, 19th century additions/alterations.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images of interior can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Information and image at Geograph.org.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Stokenham, Church of Saint Michael and All Angels.  Site has a holy well.  Probably Norman origin,this building dates from 15th century with 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted on rood screen (modern re-painting). Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings and Parish Council Website. CSJ has a photograph of the screen but a good quality digital image would be appreciated.

Swimbridge, Church of Saint James.   Chapel has been here since Norman times. This very interesting building has 13th century tower, 14th century spire, later medieval additions, 19th century restorations.  Saint James depicted on late 19th century marble and alabaster reredos. Information and images of church (including reredos) can be found at Church Website, information about building at British Listed Buildings.  There is an image of the church exterior at SJITBI Flickr Group.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Talaton, Church of Saint James.   15th century, but has Norman font, major 19th century rebuild.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Information and image at Geograph.org.  More images at SJITBI Flickr Group.  CSJ hold a booklet A Short History of St James the Great Talaton Parish Church.

Teignmouth, Church of Saint James.   Built as a chapel of ease to Bishopsteignton, it became a parish church in the 15th century.  Today only the 13th century tower remains from the original church, the rest of the structure was rebuilt in an unusual octagonal, possibly North African-influenced, design in early 19th century.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Haldon Mission Community Website. images at the Church of England website.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Tiverton

Torbryan, Church of Holy Trinity, now redundant.  15th century with 19th century vestry. Saint James is depicted on the medieval rood screen with pilgrim hat, staff, book and bag. Information about church at British Listed Buildings, information and images of church at The Churches Conservation Trust Website.  Images of the screen can be seen at Geograph.org, with a good close-up by John Salmon of the Saint James panel here.  In 2013 2 panels were torn out and stolen, but have recently been recovered by the police – see the Guardian Website for details.  The Churches Conservation Trust is now trying to raise £7000 to repair and restore the panels in the screen, see here for how to donate. CSJ holds some photographs of the screen panels.

Wolborough, Church of Saint Mary the Virgin. 15th century with an earlier west tower.  Saint James is reported depicted on the medieval rood screen, although we do not have a clear image of the actual panel.  Information about church at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Church Website, confirmation of figure of Saint James at “Some Old Devon Churches” by John Stabb. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, a good quality digital image of the Saint James figure would be very useful.

Also of interest:

Bradninch, Church of Saint Disen. Medieval, mainly 15/16th century, 19th century restoration.  Saint James is reported depicted with 51 other saints on a medieval painted wood screen (15th century with painted panels added in 16th century, paint restored in 19th century) although we do not have an image of the relevant part of the screen to verify this.  Information and images of screen at British Listed Buildings,  image of exterior and more information at Devon CC Historic Environment.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, an image of the reputed Saint James figure would be very useful to assist us in a positive identification.

Buckland-in-the-Moor, Church of Saint Peter.  15th and early 16th century, early 20th century restoration.  Saint James is reported depicted on a medieval painted wood screen (restored in 19th century) although we do not have an image of the relevant part of the screen to verify this.  Information and images of church and screen at British Listed Buildings, more information at Legendary Dartmoor.   CSJ holds 3 photographs of the screen, the figure identified as Saint James would appear to be possibly Saint Bartholomew, good quality digital images of all the figures would be very helpful in determining whether Saint James is in fact depicted.

Totnes

  • Early medieval wool town where 6 routes converge on River Dart crossing.  It is speculated that 2 shrines of Saint James may have existed but we cannot trace any evidence.  More information would be very welcome regarding shrines or as a place of embarkation for pilgrims.  One shrine may have been in Bridgetown where a Fair of Saint James was also held, see entry for Bridgetown above.
  • Church of Saint Mary.  15th century stone rood screen is reported to be decorated with scallop shells.  There are images at Geograph.org but none clear enough to verify the decoration. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information needed please.

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Dorset (including Bournemouth)

The CSJ holds various notes and maps but a great deal more detailed work is required on pilgrim ports and routes.

Alderholt, Church of Saint James.   1849 with 1922 chancel.   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and information and some images at Church Website. No known depictions of Saint James. Image can be found at Geograph.org. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Bere Regis, Church of Saint John the Baptist.   Pre-Conquest origin, rebuilt 12th century, later additions and a 19th century restoration.  Full length painted wood figure of Saint James depicted on 15th century nave roof, although the church identifies this figure as Saint Philip, purely on the basis that the apostles must have been arranged alphabetically. The church is magnificent and well worth a visit. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings,  Church Website and Great English Churches.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Bridport, Chapel of Saint James, reported in 1791 as located in Wyke’s Court Lane, but converted into a house.  See opcdorset website for details.  Wyke’s Court Lane no longer exists, is this where Wyke’s Court car park is now situated?  More information on chapel and location would be very helpful.

Chedington Church of Saint James. Built in 1840-1 to replace an older church on an adjacent site (which has long disappeared). This church became redundant in 1980 and is now a private house. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and lots more images at RightMove. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.  Any information on the pre-1840 church and its dedication would be appreciated.

East Chelborough (Lewcombe), Church of Saint James.  The core of this tiny building is 12th century with 16th century windows and 18th century alterations.  The striking circular east window has 19th century glass.  The church once served the medieval village of Lewcombe, which disappeared centuries ago.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and information and multiple images at Dorset Historic Churches Trust. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Hanford, Fair of Saint James, by charter 1241 ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Dorset 2007

Hazelbury Bryan, Church of Saint Mary and Saint James. Earliest mention of church was in 14th century when it was dedicated to Saint Mary, the dedication changing to Saint Mary and Saint James when the church was rebuilt in 1400.  This building is mainly 15th century with a 19th century chancel and 19th and 20th century restorations.    Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Benefice website, and information and multiple images at Dorset Historic Churches Trust. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Hilton, Church of All Saints.  Possible 12th century origin, 16th century tower and porch and a 19th century vestry and restoration. Medieval painted wood panel has figures of apostles, including Saint James. Panels formed part of a screen which was taken from Milton Abbey in 1774. Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings, more information and images at Dorset Historic Churches Trust.  Good-size image of panel at Geograph.org, Saint James is depicted on far right of panel.  CSJ holds a guide booklet for this church, also see information for Milton Abbey in “Also of Interest” section below.

Holt

  • Church of Saint James. Built in 1836 to replace an older chapel of ease to Wimborne Minster (known to have been here since at least 14th century). Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and more information plus images at Dorset Historic Churches Trust. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.  Any information on the pre-1836 chapel would be appreciated.
  • Fair of Saint James, to be held at the chapel, by charter 1368 ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Dorset 2007

Kingston (Corfe Castle), Chapel of Saint James has existed here since 12th century.  First Earl of Eldon replaced dilapidated medieval building with a new building in 1833.  The third Earl of Eldon then built a magnificent private chapel in 1880 in a different location.  In 1922 the 1833 building became the village hall and the 1880 building became the parish church, known as the Cathedral of the Purbecks.  The 1833 building then became a private residence in the 1970s.

The CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for these church buildings.

Kingston Russell Chapel of Saint James, long disappeared.  Pre-reformation origin, in ruins by mid-17th century. Information can be found at Wikipedia. CSJ does not hold any additional information for this chapel.

Longburton, Church of Saint James the Great. Formerly a chapel of Sherborne, probably in existence in 12th century – see British History Online. This building has 13th century west tower, 15th century nave and chancel, 17th century north chapel and 19th century north aisle and restoration.  Saint James depicted in stained glass in north aisle (pilgrim hat with shell, staff with gourd and book).  Some of the stained glass is early 15th century, restored in the 1970s, the Saint James panel is relatively modern. Information about the church can be found at British Listed Buildings and information and multiple images of church at Dorset Historic Churches Trust.  Image of window at Geograph.org.  CSJ holds some guide material and information about the windows.

Milton Abbas – see British History Online for information on all three buildings:

  • Church of Saint James, built by the Earl of Dorchester around 1786 as a replacement parish church (the village had previously used the church at Milton Abbey, dedicated to St Mary, St Sansom and St Branwalader. The Earl demolished Middleton village and replaced it with Milton Abbas (out of view of the estate). The church was enlarged 1866.  See British Listed Buildings and localhistories.org for information and geograph.org for an image.
  • Milton Abbey, Saxon foundation, the church is now the chapel for a boy’s public school.  Painted panel of Saint James in Church of All Saints Hilton (detailed above) came from the abbey church.  This was a medieval pilgrim destination in its own right, and also a way-point on the route between Blandford Forum and Dorchester.  See British Listed Buildings and Dorset Historic Churches Trust for information and images
  • Saint Catherine’s Chapel, originally a chapel to Milton Abbey. medieval pilgrims were granted 120 days indulgence for visiting.  Late 12th century, it is the oldest building to survive from the abbey complex.  Restored and reconsecrated in the early 20th century after a period of secular use and dereliction. See British Listed Buildings and Dorset Historic Churches Trust for information and images.

Pokesdown (Bournemouth) Church of Saint James. Built in 1858 to serve increased local population. Enlarged in 1870 and again in 1931.  Information and images can be found at church website and Roy Hodges’ excellent PDF of a 1963 Christchurch Herald piece. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Poole  Information and images on church and port can be found at Dorset OPC

  • Church of Saint James. Church in existence at least since 12th century.  It is thought to have been substantially rebuilt in the 16th century but had become dilapidated and was rebuilt in 1821.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings. No known depictions of Saint James, although there are scallop shells depicted in one of the stained glass windows, see church website for image.  Images of interior of church at church website gallery, exterior can be seen at Geograph.org.  CSJ holds a photograph of the church and a photocopy of a 1732 survey of Dorset.
  • Pilgrim Port.  International wool trade from 13th century onwards. CSJ has various notes and information about the port in general, and about Harry Paye the notorious pirate (and occasional pilgrim-carrier), but this needs a lot of organisation and development.

Shaftesbury

  • Church of Saint James. Church thought to have been in existence here since 12th century. By the 19th century the medieval church was too small and dilapidated to be useful so was demolished and replaced with a larger building.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Dorset Historic Churches Trust. No known depictions of Saint James.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.
  • Shaftesbury Abbey, founded in 888 and dedicated to Mother of God and St Edward, was an important pilgrimage site to visit the shrine of Saint Edward the Martyr.  The abbey was the second richest convent in England at the time of the Dissolution, see Wikipedia for information.

Sherborne

  • Almhouse of Saint John the Baptist and Saint John the Evangelist, founded 1437, contains a 15th century Flemish triptych with an image of Saint James on the rear (pilgrim hat and staff).  See British Listed Buildings and sherbornedorset.co.uk for information and images of almshouse.  A b/w image of the panel of Saint James can be seen at British History Online.
  • Sherborne Abbey, Chapel of the Holy Sepulchre.  Contains a 15th century Burgundian wooden statue of saint James (donated to abbey in 20th century).   For general information about the abbey see sherborneabbey.com and for photos of the chapel and statue see Dorset Historic Churches Trust.  CSJ holds a guide book for the abbey and some photos of the statue.
  • The hospice of Saint Julian, late medieval, see British Listed Buildings.  Was this a pilgrim hospice? More information please.

Wimborne Minster, Church of Saint Cuthberga. Silver figure of Saint James recorded in  churchwardens’ records of 1475 – see archive.org, also a silver chalice belonging to Saint James recorded by Edward VI’s commissioners – see British History Online. These objects appear to be long disappeared, but was there a chapel of Saint James within the church? Also stained glass window reported – verification needed.

Also of Interest:

Beaminster, Church of Saint Mary of the Annunciation.   There is a suggestion that a pilgrim figure is depicted on upper levels of tower – more information/images please. Information at CofE website.

Fishpond Bottom, Guppy’s Lodge (private house).  Estate agent description- see rightmove–  states that this was a pilgrim shelter for Whitchurch Canonicorum at one time, can this be verified?  More information please!

Marshwood, Church of Saint Mary.   There is a suggestion that there was a pilgrim shelter here – more information please.   There is also an interesting suggestion of a link between Chaucer and this area – see Yarn magazine website article for details.

Okeford Fitzpaine, Church of Saint Andrew.  A 19th century figure of Saint James has been reported on the restored 15th century stone pulpit – verification needed.

Shave Cross Inn, 700 year old inn reputed to be the place haircuts were administered to monks wishing to be freshly tonsured or penitents requiring shaven heads before visiting St Wite’s shrine at Whitchurch Canonicorum.  See the inn website for information.

Weymouth. A pilgrim hospice has been suggested here – verification needed.

Whitchurch Canonicorum, Church of Saint Candida and Holy Cross, Saxon origins, this building is Norman with later medieval and modern additions/alterations. Contains the shrine of Saint Wite (Candida) and a holy well nearby. A very important medieval pilgrimage site for healing. Known as the Cathedral of the Vale, this is the only church in England except Westminster Abbey to retain saint’s relics after the Reformation. See church website, British Listed Buildings and Dorset Historic Churches Trust for information and images.  CSJ holds a “Who was St Wite?” booklet.

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Essex

Chignall St James, Church of Saint James, now a private house.  There was a priest mentioned here in 1086, but this building dates from late 13th century with later additions and a 19th century restoration.  See British Listed Buildings for information, geograph.org for image.

Clacton-On-Sea, Church of Saint James, parish formed in 1907, church consecrated in 1913.  See British Listed Buildings for information, parish website and Friends of Essex Churches Trust for information and images.  There is a depiction of Saint James in stained glass in the north window.  More information and images please!

Colchester, Church of Saint James the Great, united with parish of Saint Paul in 1995.  Church is 12th century or earlier with various later additions and rebuilds. For information and images see British Listed Buildings and church website.  There is a wooden statue of Saint James – photo is from church Facebook page.

Dengie, Church of Saint James, 14th century with a 19th century restoration.  For information see British Listed Buildings and for information and images see Essex Churches website.  No known depictions of Saint James.

Great Saling, Church of Saint James the Great, 14th century but masked by 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in 19th century stained glass.For information see British Listed Buildings and for information and images (including window) see Essex Churches website.

Greenstead Green, Church of Saint James the Great, 1845. No known depictions of Saint James. For information see British Listed Buildings and church website and for information and images see Essex Churches website.

Hadleigh, Fair of Saint James, prescriptive, 1180s, ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Essex, 2006.

Hatfield Broad Oak, Fair of Saint James, prescriptive, 1460, ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Essex, 2006.

Little Clacton, Church of Saint James, church is 12th century with various later medieval additions and 19th century restoration. There is a depiction of Saint James in stained glass in the east window (1945).   See British Listed Buildings for information, church website for information and images (including window).

Saffron Walden

  • Walden Abbey, founded 1136 and dedicated to Saint Mary and Saint James.  Situated at the meeting point of four roads in order to provide hospitality to travellers.  The magnificent manor house of Audley End was built on its ruins, none of the original abbey survives.  See British History Online and Wikipedia for details.
  • Fair of Saint James, by charter 1136, granted to monks, to be held at church of Saint James of Walden ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Essex, 2006.
  • Church of Saint Mary, possible founded in Saxon times, a Norman church of 1130 was rebuilt/enlarged several times in the medieval period.   Contains a wooden statue of Saint James.  Please see parish website for guides and an image of the statue.    Was this the church referred to in the fair charter, and therefore at this time dedicated to Saint James?  Or was there a Saxon church of Saint Mary and a separate chapel of Saint James for the castle?  More information please!

Sewards End, Church of Saint James, 1847, enlarged 1870. Built as a chapel of ease to Saint Mary’s Saffron Walden, and also served as the village school until 1947.  No known depictions of Saint James. For information see parish website and Wikipedia, and for image see geograph.org.

Southend-On-Sea, coat of arms.  Designed in 1915, it is formed by a shield flanked by a medieval fisherman (representing the fishing community which developed at the south end of Prittlewell), and a Cluniac monk (representing Prittlewell Priory).  The monk looks very much like Saint James (hat with shell, staff and book).  Apparently the figures were copied from a manuscript in the British Museum, would be interesting to learn more.  See Southend Council and Civic Heraldry for images and more detailed information.

West Tilbury, Church of Saint James, redundant since 1980s, now a private house.  Norman in origin, there was large-scale rebuilding after the nave collapsed in 1711, followed by a 19th century restoration and rebuilding of the tower.  See Wikipedia and British Listed Buildings for information and Essex Churches for images.

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Gloucestershire & Bristol

Abson, Church of Saint James the Great.  12th century origin, 15th century tower and 19th century restoration.  Saint James in stained glass window – needs verification.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings,  information and images can be found at Church Website.

Adlestrop, Church of Saint Mary Magdalene.  13th century, 14th century tower and substantial 18th and 19th century alterations.  Saint James in c.1900 stained glass window (shell, staff with gourd).  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, image of window can be found at SJITBI Flickr group.

Ampney Crucis, Church of the Holy Rood.   Saxon origin, 15th century tower and 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in medieval wall painting.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings,  information and images of church of Britain Express, and an image of the Saint James painting can be found at V&A website.

Ashley

Bourton-on-the-Water, Church of Saint Lawrence.  14th century chancel, 18th century tower, remainder 19th century.  Saint James in 1931 stained glass window (hat with shell, staff with water bottle, book).  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, image of window can be found at SJITBI Flickr group.

Bream, Church of Saint James.   First recorded as a chapel of ease in 1505, rebuilt in 19th century.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British History Online,  exterior images can be found here.

Bristol

  • Priory of Saint James, founded 1129 as a Benedictine cell under the control of Tewkesbury Abbey.  Two buildings remain:
    • Saint James Priory – this is the monastic church which became an Anglican parish church after the Dissolution.  The church became redundant in 1984 and was then leased to the Little Brothers of Nazareth who re-established it as a Roman Catholic place of worship in 1991.  The Saint James Priory Project based at the church provides housing support to those recovering from addiction. See British Listed Buildings for information, Saint James Priory website and bristolopeningdoors website for information and images.  The CSJ holds photographs and leaflets about the priory and the Little Brothers of Nazareth.
    • The White Hart Inn, believed to incorporate parts of the original monastery, see British Listed Buildings and White Hart Inn website for details.
  • Fair of Saint James, no charters extant but William Harrison recorded a fair on 25th July in 1587 ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Gloucestershire 2010.  The Fair seems to have been held in the churchyard until 1837 when it was discontinued due to Victorian disapproval of rowdy behaviour, see BAFHS website for details.
  • Pilgrim Port, more work needed on this aspect.

Charfield, Church of Saint James, now redundant.  13th century, major rebuild in 15th century, 20th century repairs.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Churches Conservation Trust and more images here.

Cheltenham, Church of Saint James, now deconsecrated and used as a restaurant.  See here for information and images.

Chipping Campden

Clapton-on-the-Hill, Church of Saint James. 12th/13th century, restored 17th and 20th centuries.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and image of exterior at SJITBI Flickr group.

Colesbourne, Church of Saint James.  12th century with 15th century tower, substantially rebuilt in 19th century.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Colesbourne Gardens website, and more images here and at SJITBI Flickr group.

Coln St Dennis, Church of Saint James.  12th and 15th century with 19th and 20th century restorations.  Dedicated to Saint Katherine in 13th century and to Saint Dennis in 18th century, date of change in dedication to Saint James unknown. No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online, and more images here and at SJITBI Flickr group.

Cranham, Church of Saint James.  12th/15th/16th century with 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in stained glass, and in stone figure over doorway, both images date from 19th century.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Beacon Benefice website, and more images here (including stained glass), at geograph.org (stone figure) and at SJITBI Flickr group.

Cutsdean, Church of Saint James.  14th century tower, remainder 19th century rebuild.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, more images here and at SJITBI Flickr group.

Dursley, Church of Saint James the Great.  First recorded 1221, enlarged 14th century.  The 15th century tower and spire collapsed in 1698 and the tower alone was rebuilt in 1709. There have also been 19th and 20th century restorations and alterations.  Saint James is depicted in a modern mosaic floor.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website, more images here.

Fairford

Gloucester, Church of Saint James in Upton Street. Built as a chapel of ease in 1841, it soon became a parish in its own right.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British History Online and Church website,  exterior image can be found The Churches of Britain & Ireland website.

Hailes, Church (dedication unknown).  12th/14th/15th/17th century with 19th/20th century restorations. Early 14th century wallpaintings. Saint James is depicted in 15th century stained glass window which originally came from Hailes Abbey, the ruins of which lie adjacent to the church  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Sacred Destinations, more images here and an image of the Saint James window on Flickr.  Hailes Abbey was a major pilgrimage centre due to relic of Holy Blood donated in 1270, see Wikipedia for information.

Hatherop, Church of Saint Nicholas. 19th century.   Saint James is depicted in stained glass window (hat with shell, staff and gourd).  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, more images of church here, and an image of the window at SJITBI Flickr group.

Horton, Church of Saint James the Elder.  12th century origins, rebuilt in 14th century with later medieval alterations and a 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings,  exterior images can be found at geograph.org.

Kempley, Church of Saint Mary, now in the care of English Heritage.  12th/13th/14th/17th century with 19th and 20th century restorations.  The church contains some very fine medieval wall paintings and depicts two pilgrim figures, one of which may be Saint James (hat, carrying sword). Alternatively the figures may represent the church founders Hugh and Walter de Lacy.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and English Heritage, and an image of the pilgrim painting can be found at paintedchurch.org.

Lancaut, Church of Saint James, now deconsecrated and ruined, and from 2013 in the care of Forest of Dean Buildings Preservation Trust.  There was a monastic community at Lancaut from at least 703 but this building dates from 12th century.  It is not known whether it was built to serve the monks, or a leper hospice (many very specialised medicinal plants, including non-native species, grow nearby) or a now disappeared village.  No depictions of Saint James.  The Norman lead font is now in Gloucester Cathedral.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online and information and images at Wikipedia and Daily Mail.  Images of church and font here.

Lockleaze, Presbyterian Church of Saint James.  1950s, to replace a church destroyed in 1940.   No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at Church website.

Longborough, Church of Saint James.  12th/13th/14th/15th century with19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, with more images here and an exterior image on SJITBI Flickr page.

Mangotsfield, Church of Saint James.  13th century with later medieval additions and 19th century alterations.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church website.

Postlip, private RC chapel of Saint James.  12th century origin, under control of nearby Winchcombe Abbey until the Reformation when it became derelict.  Refurbished and reconsecrated in 1891 it again fell into disuse in 1915 when the church of Saint Nicholas was opened in Winchcombe.  The chapel was again restored in the 1990s and is now under the care of the Postlip Community.   No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Saint Nicholas website, more images here and on the SJITBI Flickr group.  CSJ also holds a b/w image of the church.

Quedgeley, Church of Saint James.   A church is known to have existed here in 1095, and was dedicated to Saint James and Saint Mary Magdalene in the 12th century. It was a chapel to the church of Saint Owen which belonged to Llanthony Priory. This building mainly dates from the 14th century with extensive 19th century restorations.  Saint James is depicted in a 19th century stained glass window (hat, staff with gourd, shell motif on cloak).   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online.  The church website has information and images regarding the history of the church , including an altercation during Matins between two men and their family/supporters/dogs in 1532, a case which ended being heard in the Court of the Star Chamber, and the building.  Images of church and stained glass here.

Rendcomb, Church of Saint Peter.   Possible 12th century origin, this building is a 16th century rebuild with a 19th century restoration.  Saint James is depicted in a 19th century stained glass window (hat, staff with gourd, shell motif on cloak).   A stone Norman font depicts eleven apostles but identification is not clear. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Images of church and stained glass here.  The CSJ holds some b/w photographs and a guide leaflet

Saul, Church of Saint James.   A church existed here from 1140, and at some time became a chapel of Standish (both were controlled by Gloucester Abbey). This building mainly dates from the 14th/15th/16th centuries with extensive 19th century restorations/additions.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online.   Images of church here.

Staunton

Stoke Orchard, Church of Saint James, built as a chapel of ease to Bishop’s Cleeve.  12th century nave and 14th century chancel with some 19th century repairs.  The church contains unique 12th/13th century wall paintings which depict a cycle of 28 scenes from the life of Saint James.  Unfortunately overpainting in subsequent centuries and general decay means that these paintings are fragmentary and contain no clear image of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online.   Images of church here and paintings at paintedchurch.org.

Tewkesbury, Abbey Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, building dates from 1102.  Chapel of Saint James built 1300, used as a grammar school from 1576 to 1875. Now restored from a bad state of disrepair and used as a shop. See Tewkesbury Abbey websiteWikipedia, British Listed Buildings and The Abbey Church of Tewkesbury, by H.J.L.J. Massé for information and images.

Tytherington, Church of Saint James.  Possible 12th century origins, church mainly dates from 13th/14th/15th centuries.  There have also been 19th and 20th century restorations and alterations. No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Tytherington Roots website, more images here.

Westerleigh, Church of Saint James the Great.  Nave and chancel consecrated 1304, church mainly dates from 15th century when tower was added.  There have also been 17th and 18th century alterations and 19th, 20th and 21st century restorations and repairs. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, and information and images (including a tour of the church) on the church website, more images here.  There is an icon of Saint James (see virtual tour on church website) but no other known depictions.

West Littleton, Church of Saint James. 13th C origin, church mainly dates from 1855 when it was substantially rebuilt following a fire. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, and information and images on the church website, more images here.   No known depictions of Saint James.

Also of Interest:

Chipping Sodbury, Rounceval Street, first recorded as Rounsivalle Street in 1595.  Chipping Sodbury lies on the salt route between Droitwich and Bristol and would no doubt have been travelled by many pilgrims.  Any connection between pilgrimage and the street name is as yet purely speculative. Information can be found at Rounceval House Hotel website and mysodbury.co.uk

Stow-on-the-Wold, The Royalist Hotel (currently called The Porch House), reputed to be partly constructed from a 10th century pilgrim hospice.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Porch House website.  Further information/evidence would be helpful.

South Cerney, All Hallows Church, fragments of a 12th century wooden crucifix found hidden in the church walls in 1915.  The fragments are now in the British Museum, although replicas are on display in the church, and are believed by some experts to be of Spanish origin.  See British Museum website for details and an image of the crucifix and British Listed Buildings for details and images of the church.   CSJ holds two guide booklets, one for the church and one for the rood.

Winchcombe Abbey, founded in 798 at the centre of the Mercian kingdom, and containing the shrine of Saint Kenelm, was a popular pilgrimage site in medieval times – see Wikipedia for details.

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Greater Manchester

Some very meticulous research into the historic county of Lancashire was carried out in the 1990s by Michael Dickinson and his very useful notes are still on file.

Ashton-under-Lyne, Church of Saint James. 1860s, built to cater for increasing population of growing mill and mining town. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.    More images relating to this church would be helpful.

Ashworth, Church of Saint James, known as Ashworth Chapel. Established 1514 as a chapel of ease by the Holt family for themselves and their rural tenants. The industrial revolution caused the development of small textile mills and mines nearby, and the population increased accordingly.  The chapel was rebuilt  in the 18th century, and enlarged and became a parish in its own right in the 19th century.  As people moved to the larger cities the population fell again and the parish was united with Saint Paul’s in Norden in the 1940s. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website (clicking on any of the images on this site takes you to a very detailed gallery).

Bickershaw, Church of Saint James and Saint Elizabeth, originally known as the Johnson Memorial Church, built 1904-5 to cater for increasing population of mineworkers. No known depictions of Saint James but shell, staff and sword are carved on the altar. Information and images can be found at Lancashire Online Parish Clerks and Church Website.    More images relating to this church would be helpful.

Bolton, Waterloo Street, Church of Saint James the Apostle, built 1860s/70s to serve growing industrial population.  Closed and demolished in the 1960s. Information and images can be found at Lancashire Online Parish Clerks and information at National Archives.

Breightmet, Church of Saint James. 1850s. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and CofE website.   The church also has a Facebook page.

Broughton, Church of Saint James. 1870s. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at Wikipedia and Church website.

Calderbrook, Church of Saint James, built 1860s as a chapel of ease to Littleborough. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Lancashire Online Parish Clerks.

Collyhurst, Church of Saint James, built 1870s, closed 1971 and now demolished. Information and images can be found at Lancashire Online Parish Clerks and information at National Archives.  Image at Pinterest.

Daisy Hill, Church of Saint James. 1879-81, built to cater for increasing population of textile workers. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.    More images relating to this church would be helpful.

Didsbury, Church of Saint James. Established 1235 as an oratory chapel for Nicholas de Longford, churchyard added in 14th century to provide burial space for Black Death victims.   The church was significantly rebuilt in the 17th and 19th centuries.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wikipedia and Church Website .

East Crompton, Church of Saint James. 1847, built to cater for increasing population of textile workers. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, information at Church Website.    More images relating to this church would be helpful.

Gatley Green, Church of Saint James. 1881. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.   More information or images relating to this church would be helpful.

Hattersley, RC Church of Saint James the Great.  Founded in the 1960s to serve the builders of the Hattersley housing estate, this building dates from the early 1980s.  Saint James is depicted in a simple, modern painting, see The Churches of Britain and Ireland for an image. Information can be found at Taking Stock website.  More information or images relating to this church would be helpful.

Heywood, Church of Saint James.   19th century . No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and GENUKI.   There is a suggestion that this church is More information or images relating to this church would be helpful.

Hope, Church of Saint James.   1860s .Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.   The church has Capronnier stained glass (although some windows were destroyed in WWII), including an unusual depiction of Saint James preparing for martyrdom which can be viewed on Flickr in the SJITBI group.

Manchester

  • Birch-in-Rusholme, Church of Saint James.  Founded as a chapel in the late 16th century by the Birch family, this was for a period of time in the 17th century a Presbyterian Chapel.  The church was rebuilt in 1845-6, closed in 1981 and is now used as care home.   Please see British History Online and GENUKI for details.  The Rusholme Archive mentions A History of the Ancient Chapel of Birch: In Manchester Parish, Including a Sketch of the Township of Rusholme, for the Convenience of Which Township the Chapel Was Originally Erected: Together with Notices of the More Ancient Local Families’, by John Booker which is available from Google as a free ebook.  After closure of the church, the parish of Saint James was merged with the parish of Holy Innocents to become the parish of Holy Innocents and Saint James, and there is a statue of Saint James with scallop shell and pilgrim staff in Holy Innocents church in Fallowfield.  See Wikipedia and British Listed Buildings for information and SJITBI Flickr group for an image of the statue.
  • Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Mary, St Denys and St George, chantry chapel of Saint James (known as Strangeways Chapel), established 1507, now disappeared.  Screen dating from early 16th century was moved from Saint James’ Chapel to the Ely Chapel.  The re-siting of the screen and the destruction of the many chantry chapels occurred in the early 19th century when some crude restoration was carried out.  There was also serious WWII bomb damage. Please see British History Online for details and Manchester 2002 for a plan of the cathedral.
  • George Street, Church of Saint James.  Founded 1788, closed 1928 and demolished 1950s.  Replaced by office block called St James’s House. See manchesterhistory.net for information and images.
  • Gorton, Church of Saint James.  Founded as a chapel of ease, circumstantial evidence suggests late 15th century, although first written records are from 16th century.  The wattle and daub, rush-floored building was replaced with a brick structure in the 18th century and the dedication changed to Saint Thomas. When the church was rebuilt again in the 19th century the dedication reverted to Saint James.  Please see British History Online and Gorton’s Past by Stan Clarke for detailed history, British Listed Buildings and GENUKI for image and information.  The rushbearing festival in early September continued until the early 19th century, and was revived again in the 1980s although it is unclear whether this continues today.
  • Moss Side, Church of Saint James.  19th century, rebuilt late 20th century. Has a significant Marathi-speaking congregation.   No known depictions of Saint James. Please see church website and GENUKI for image and information.
  • St Ann Street, Church of Saint Ann, 18th century.  Saint James depicted in 18th century stained glass, image on Flickr in SJITBI group.  See church website for general information about church.

Millbrook, Church of Saint James. 19th century, built to cater for increasing population of mill workers. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and church website    More images relating to this church would be helpful.  The CSJ has no additional information or images for this church.

Milnrow, Church of Saint James the Apostle.  Founded as a chapel in 1497 by the Butterworth family, it was rebuilt three times; 1798, 1815 and again in 1869.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Please see British History Online for information and British Listed Buildings, Rochdale Online and Facebook for information and images.

Montserrat, RC Church of Saint James the Great, date of foundation unknown, building modern.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at Lancashire Online Parish Clerks and Catholic Directory. More information/images relating to this church would be helpful.  The CSJ has no additional information or images for this church.

New Bury, Farnsworth, Church of Saint James, built 1860s, closed 2011 and now awaiting disposal by the CofE. Information and images can be found at Bolton Revisited (including confirmation of Saint James depicted in stained glass) and parish website.  Information about closure at CofE website and Bolton News.  Detailed history PDF here.

Oldham, Church of Saint James. 19th century, built to cater for increasing population of textile workers. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia.

Orrell, RC Church of Saint James, founded 1699, this church building dates from 1805 with later 19th century enlargements/additions.  Possible depiction of Saint James – statue on exterior over west door – confirmation needed. Information and images can be found at church website, British Listed Buildings and Taking Stock.  The CSJ has no additional information or images for this church.

Prestwich, Church of Saint Mary. This building dates from 1500.  Pilgrim wearing scallop shell depicted in Works of Mercy stained glass, see SJITBI for images of glass and Wikipedia and British Listed Buildings for information about the church and more images.

Salford, RC Church of Saint James and All Souls, founded 1875 as Church of Mother of God and Saint James, church demolished 1973 and replaced with modern building in 1975.  Amalgamated with All Souls in 2005. Painted statue of Saint James. Information and images can be found at church website and Taking Stock.  The CSJ has no additional information or images for this church.

Thornham, Church of Saint James. 1928.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at Church Website and GENUKI.   More images relating to this church would be helpful.  More information/images would be welcome.

Wardle, Church of Saint James.   Built 1856, closed 1990, awaiting redevelopment as apartments. Long period of unoccupancy led to it being used as a cannabis factory – see Manchester Evening News. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and GENUKI.   More information or images relating to this church would be helpful.

Wardleworth, Church of Saint Mary & Saint James. Built in 1821 as the CofE Church of Saint James, in 1975 it became the Ukrainian Catholic Church of Saint Mary & Saint James . No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Lancashire Online Parish Clerks.  The altar was moved to the Church of Saint May in the Baum.

Westleigh, Church of Peter.   1881 foundation.  Saint James depicted on stone reredos (book, staff with shell). Information can be found at Wikipedia and images of the reredos can be seen at SJITBI Flickr group.

Wigan (Poolstock), Church of Saint James with Saint Thomas.   1866 foundation, amalgamated with parish of Saint Thomas in 1970. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wikipedia and Church Website.   More information or images relating to this church would be helpful.

Woolford, Church of Saint James. 1931.  No known depictions of Saint James. Limited information and image can be found at Church Website and GENUKI.   More images relating to this church would be helpful.  More information/images would be welcome.

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Hampshire

Ashmansworth, Church of Saint James.   Dates from mid-12th century, has fragments of mid-14th century wallpaintings.  Previously dedicated to Saint Nicholas.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Parish Website, British History Online.  Images can be found at Astoft website.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Beauworth, Church of Saint James, 1838, became a parish in its own right 1879.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online. Images can be found at Hampshire Church Windows, Historic Churches and Hampshire Churches.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Bossington, Church of Saint James, originally a chapelry of Broughton, completely rebuilt 1839.  Stained glass window of scallop shell with “SANTIAGO”.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online and Houghton & Bossington Community Website. Images can be found at Hampshire Church Windows and British Listed Buildings.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Bramley, Church of Saint James.   Church existed in village at 1086, this building dates from 12th century with additions all the way through to 20th century.  13th century wall painting believed to be Saint James, north of east window, in poor condition. Pre-Reformation, the church was dedicated to All Saints or All Hallows. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Church Website, British History Online.  Images can be found at Astoft website and Hampshire History website.  CSJ holds a guide leaflet from the church.

Clanfield, Church of Saint James, originally a chapelry of Chalton first mentioned in 1227, completely rebuilt 1875, damaged by fire 2007, since repaired.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online, LocalHistories.org and Clanfield Online Website. Images can be found at Hampshire Churches and Geograph.org.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Eastney, Church of Saint Margaret of Scotland, built 1903, closed in 2015 owing to major structural problems.  Saint James depicted in stained glass with sword, book and shells. Information can be found at Portsmouth local newspaper. Images can be found at Geograph.org and of window at SJITBI Flickr group.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

East Tisted

Emsworth, Church of Saint James, 1839 -1840.   Triptych of Life of Saint James on altar, plus a stained glass image of Saint James with sword. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Church website and Local Histories.Org. Images can be found at Geograph.org and at SJITBI Flickr Group. CSJ does not hold any additional information for this church.

Hunton, Church of Saint James, medieval origins, rebuilt 18th century and rebuilt 1865.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Vision of Britain. Images can be found at Hampshire Churches.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Milton, Church of Saint James, 1841, rebuilt 1913.   Stone figure of Saint James (hat with shell, staff and bag) above West door – see SJITBI Flickr Group for image. Information can be found at Church website and History in Portsmouth. Images can be found at The Churches of Britain & Ireland and Geograph.Org.

Shirley, Church of Saint James, 1836, chancel added 1881.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings . Image can be found at Hampshire Churches.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Southampton, Pilgrim Port.  There was a gate in the medieval wall by the dockside once known as Pilgrim Gate (later Biddlesgate), and a stone house/warehouse named Ronceval, probably after Roncevaux Priory.   The CSJ holds various photocopied information relating to medieval port history but nothing specific on pilgrimage to Santiago. Much more information is needed.

Southwick, Church of Saint James Without The Priory Gate.  Portchester Priory was founded in 1133, refounded at Southwick 1145-53, church probably pre-dated it, may date from pre-Conquest.  Substantially rebuilt 1566 with material from dissolved priory.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Parish Website Guide, British History Online.  Images can be found at Astoft website and an image of the interior at SJITBI Flickr group.  CSJ holds a church guide booklet from 1993 (however, the Parish Website Guide pdf updates this).

Upper Wield, Church of Saint James, dates from around 1150 with 15th century additions and an 1884 restoration.  Traces of wall paintings and carvings from various periods. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, and British History Online.  Images can be found at Astoft website and Hampshire History website.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Upper Woodcott, Church of Saint James, 1853 .   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Images are difficult to find, an interactive map is available at GoHistoric.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.  Please do not confuse with Church of Saint James the Less at nearby Litchfield.

West End, Church of Saint James, established as chapelry to South Stoneham 1834, first church building 1838, replaced 1890.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.  Image can be found at Hampshire Church Windows and Hampshire Churches.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Winchester

A major pilgrim destination in Saxon and medieval times, the Old Minster housing the tomb of Saint Swithun and the New Minster those of King Alfred, Saint Grimbald and Saint Judoc, and the town being situated on the route from Reading Abbey to Southampton.

  • Winchester Cathedral, built 1093 on the site of the Old Minster.  Contained the shrine of Saint Swithun until its destruction in 1539.  Still owns the Lillebon Panel, a painted wooden panel dating from around 1315 which depicts Saint James as a pilgrim with bag and staff.  Details about the cathedral can be found here; we would appreciate any online information or images concerning the Lillebon Panel as CSJ only holds a b/w photocopy of a picture of a close up of the panel.
  • St Swithun’s Priory.  Dissolved in 1539, the 13th/14th century guest house remains as Pilgrims’ Hall.  See cityofwinchester.co.uk for picture.
  • Church of Saint James, Saxon or earlier origins, now disappeared.  Originally situated in fields on a hill outside the West Gate, overlooking the Roman road between Salisbury and Winchester, on each Palm Sunday the monks from the Old and New Minsters would process to Saint James church for the Blessing of the Palms, a tradition which spanned from at least 970 to 1539.  Saint James was connected by a lane to a church of Saint Faith, also long gone; the cult of Saint Faith (deriving from the Abbey church of Conques) is closely associated with the pilgrimage to Santiago.  The church seems to have lost its congregation during the Black Death; in 1396 the priest applied to the Pope to be relieved from the care of souls in this parish.  By 1560 the church had disappeared, although the churchyard remained and from 1589 began to be used solely for the interment of Roman Catholics who were not permitted burial in Anglican churchyards.  Information obtained from The Ancient Catholic Church of St James in Winchester by Peter Paul Bogan in St Cross and the Cemetery of St James Winchester, Publication No. 1 of the Winchester Catholic History Group (in the CSJ library) and from Find A Grave.

Woodmancott, Church of Saint James, medieval origins, rebuilt 19th century, possibly after a fire.   Conflicting information on exact dates as British Listed Buildings does not agree with British History Online. Image can be found at historicchurches.co.uk.   No known depictions of Saint James, further information on this church would be appreciated. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Also of Interest:

Romsey Abbey.  Dates from early 10th C. Contains early 16th century Italian altarpiece depicting Saint Roch (hat, cloak, staff and boots, wound on leg). See Romsey Abbey website for information and an image of the altarpiece.  More images on SJITBI Flickr group.

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Herefordshire

Herefordshire was previously comprehensively researched by Peter Stanley and the CSJ retains his very useful detailed notes in the office.

Bartestree History of both buildings at GENUKI 

  • Church of Saint James.  19th century by Nicholson replacing medieval chapel of Saint James.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, and British History Online.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.  Is this church now a house or still in use?
  • Chapel of Saint James.   Medieval origin at Longworth, dismantled and rebuilt several miles away at Bartestree RC convent in 19th century.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and guide and images at Historic Chapels Trust.

Canon Frome, Church of Saint James.   Medieval origin, Canons of Llanthony Abbey were established here by 1280, church sustained severe damage in Civil War and was rebuilt in 1680.  The church was rebuilt again in 1860, save for the 17th century west tower.  Saint James and his Martyrdom depicted in 1873 Frederick Preedy stained glass window. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wishful Thinking and visitoruk.com.  Image of window here and of church here.

Colwall, Church of Saint James the Great.   Saxon origins, this building dates from 12th century with various additions/alterations up until 19th century.  Church retains some Norman features and the nave has an impressive late medieval roof.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website . Flickr has a variety of good quality images by AJK Photography   The church has its own Ale House in the grounds, now used like a church hall.

Cradley, Church of Saint James the Great.   Possibly Saxon origins, this building dates from around 1200, heightened in 15th century and restored by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1868. .  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website . Images can be found at the CRSBI website.

Hereford, Church of Saint James the Great.   Built 1869, rebuilt 1902.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and image can be found at Parish Website .

Kimbolton, Church of Saint James.   12th century chancel, 13th century nave, 19th and 20th century restorations. Belonged via the Leominster cell to Reading Abbey.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, images of church at Herefordshire Historic Churches Trust.

Kinnersley

Ocle Pychard, Church of Saint James the Great.   14th century with 19th century restorations. Depiction of Saint James reported in stained glass window, a good quality digital image would be appreciated. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, images of church at Herefordshire Churches.

Stanford Bishop, Church of Saint James the Greater.   Built around 1200, with a slightly later chancel, restored 1885.  Situated on a hill with a circular churchyard, ancient yew and a small standing stone in hedge by gate. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, images of church at Herefordshire Churches.

Tarrington, Church of Saint Philip & Saint James (almost certainly James the Just, since both Saints’ feast days fall on 1st May).   12th century with 16th century tower and 19th/20th century additions/restoration.  Depiction of Saint James reported in stained glass window, a good quality digital image would be appreciated. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, image of church at Herefordshire Historic Churches Trust.

Tedstone Delamere, Church of Saint James.   Possibly Saxon origins, 11th century with later medieval additions and 19th century restoration and chancel by Sir G G Scott.  Depiction of Saint James reported in stained glass window, a good quality digital image would be helpful. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Parish Website, image of church at Herefordshire Historic Churches Trust.

Tedstone Wafer, Church of Saint James.  Medieval church now a ruin.  Replaced by 19th century church on a different site, which at some point was dedicated to Saint Mary.  It is variously called Saint Mary’s and Saint James’.   This later building became redundant in the 1960s and has been a private house since the 1990s. Any information about the varying dedication would be welcome.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings (medieval ruin),  British Listed Buildings (19th century church) and Places of Worship Database.  Image of 19th century church at Herefordshire Historic Churches Trust.   An image of the medieval church ruins would assist in completing our records.

Wigmore

Wigmore Abbey, dedicated to Saint James, founded 1179 as an Augustinian house. The canons moved around between several sites, including Shobdon, before settling at this location.  The ruins date from the 12th century and form part of a private house, currently owned by the actor Roger Challis of Only Fools and Horses fame.   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wikipedia and Pastscape, image at Geograph.org.

Winforton, Fair of James granted by charter 1318, ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Herefordshire 2005

Also of interest:

Churches of the Herefordshire School of Sculpture – many examples exist in the area covered by the medieval diocese of Hereford.  These churches are of Romanesque style with lavish and imaginative sculptural decoration.  Some churches show striking similarities with buildings in France and with the Puerto de las Platerías of Santiago Cathedral, although there is much that is highly original and appears to be a fusion of Celtic, Saxon, Viking and Norman. The earliest examples are believed to be Church of Saint John at Shobdon (dismantled and reassembled, now sadly reduced to a weathered folly) and the very special Church of Saint Mary and Saint David at Kilpeck.  Shobdon was commissioned by Oliver de Merlimond prior to a pilgrimage to Santiago, and it is often said that he took his mason with him to Spain, however there is no definitive evidence for this.  The unique Herefordshire styles – there are at least three separate “schools” identified – could be a result of Continental craftsmen hired by, and catering to, the tastes of Norman lords inspired by their travels in Europe, working alongside local masons with their own ideas and traditions, and it is possible that some of those local masons could have travelled, or indeed worked, in France and Spain.

For those who are interested to find out more, a good place to start is the website of the Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland (CRSBI) – use their Search function and type in Herefordshire in the Search Box, choosing to filter by Diocese Medieval to bring up all relevant locations on the interactive map.

The CSJ holds a monograph on the Herefordshire School (covering churches at Shobdon, Kilpeck, Leominster, Rowlestone, Rock and Holt, tympana at Llanbadarn Fawr, Fownhope, Stretton Sugas, Brinsop, Ruardean, Billingsley, Aston and Aston Eyre, and fonts at Eardisley, Castle Frome, Stottesdon, Chattesley Corbett, Shodbon, Orleton and Hereford).  The CSJ also holds various newspaper articles on some of these churches.

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Hertfordshire

Baldock, Fair of James first granted by Letter Patent 1492, ©Samantha Letters,Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Hertfordshire 2005.

Berkamsted

  • Church or chapel of Saint James, no longer in existence
  • Holy well of Saint James or Saint John
  • Fair on Saint James’ Day

There is conflicting information on the chapel/church.  Some consider that this was a chapel inside the walls of Berkamsted Castle, but there is evidence that this was in fact a parochial church.  It is suggested that it was sited where the post office now stands in the high street.   In the 12th century the Bishop of Lincoln visited Saint James’ to put a stop to the worshipping of nymphs and sprites at the nearby holy well.  The well is believed to be the natural spring which used to flow down St John’s Well Lane until the 1930s, and which is various referred to as Saint James’ Well or Saint John’s Well.

Around the early 13th C Saint Peter’s parish church was built and it may be that Saint James’ role then became that of chapel to Saint John’s Hospital.  Was the church “downgraded” and put into monastic hands because of its association with pagan practices?  Or had the town simply grown in such a way that Saint James’ had become obsolete?

Information can be found at British History Online, Wikipedia – Berkhamsted, Wikipedia – Saint Peter’s Berkhamsted, Archaeology Data Service and in A County of Small Towns: The Development of Hertfordshire’s Urban Landscape by T. R. Slater, Nigel Goose. 

Bushey

  • Church of Saint James.  Church or chapel here from at least 12th century, this building has 13th century chancel, 15th century tower, 19th century restoration.  Saint James carved in 19th century reredos, also two banners. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings,Church Website (with some pictures) and British History Online.  The CSJ also holds a 1981 guide to the church (which identifies Saint James on the reredos as Saint Joseph) and a service sheet for Saint James’ Day Pilgrim Praise service 1992.
  • Fair of James, 1141 by charter,  ©Samantha Letters,Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Hertfordshire 2005.

Codicote, Fair of Saint James the Apostle.  Granted by charter in 1272 to the abbot of Saint Albans who held a manor in the village.  Information can be found at British History Online and  ©Samantha Letters,Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Hertfordshire 2005.

Goffs Oak, Church of Saint James.  1860s, built as a daughter church to saint Mary the Virgin at Cheshunt.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website (with some pictures).  The CSJ does not hold any additional information or images for this church.

Great Gaddesden, Church of Saint John the Baptist.  19th century window of Saint James (staff, hat with shell, book), memorial to Arthur Williamson. Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images of church at Hertfordshire Genealogy Website and SJITBI Flickr group (including window). The CSJ does not hold any additional information for this church.

High Wych, Church of Saint James.  1860s.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed BuildingsChurch Website (with some pictures) and images at Hertfordshire Churches .  The CSJ does not hold any additional information or images for this church.

Lilley, Church of Saint Peter, 19th century. 1891 window of Saint James, memorial to the Haviland brothers. Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings, information on window at Stained Glass Records and an image of the window by Ian A Wood can be viewed at Fluidr.  The CSJ does not hold any additional information for this church, a good quality digital image of the window would be very helpful.

North Mymms, Church of Saint Mary. Saint James depicted holding a scallop shell in a 1361 brass memorial to William de Kestevene. Information about church and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website and very good images including close-ups of the brass by Stiffleaf can be viewed here. The CSJ does not hold any additional information for this church, more details about, and a good quality digital image of, the brass would be very helpful.

Old Hatfield, Church of Saint Etheldreda.  19th century window of Saint James, possibly by Clayton & Bell. Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images of church, but not window, at Church Website and an image of window by Robin Croft can be viewed on Flickr.  The CSJ does not hold any additional information for this church, more details about, and a good quality digital image of, the window would be very helpful.

Old Knebworth, Church of Saint Mary & Saint Thomas of Canterbury.  Saint James depicted in a 1414 brass memorial to Simon Bache. Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images of church and brass at Church Website, and a good image of the brass by Stiffleaf can be viewed here.  The CSJ does not hold any additional information for this church, more details about, and a good quality digital image of, the brass would be of assistance.

St Albans, Cathedral and Abbey Church of Saint Alban.  11th century with later additions/alterations. Saint James depicted holding a shell in a 14th century brass memorial to Abbot Thomas de la Mare. Information about cathedral can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images of cathedral at Wikipedia, and a good image of the brass by Stiffleaf can be viewed here.  St Albans was a place of pilgrimage in its own right for people wishing to visit the relics of Saint Alban, the first English martyr and Saint Amphibalus, the priest he protected. The CSJ hold an educational booklet A Pilgrim’s Visit to the Medieval Town and Monastery of St Albans. A good quality digital image of the brass would be very helpful.

Stanstead Abbotts, Church of Saint James, 12th century origins with later additions and an 18th century interior. Now redundant and in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online and Herts Memories (with some pictures).  The CSJ holds two black and white postcards for this church.

Thorley, Church of Saint James the Great, 12th century door, main body of church 13th century with 15th century tower and 19th century restoration.   There is a 19th century stained glass window of Saint James which can be seen on the Friends of St James website. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online and there is a church guide at Friends of St James website. The CSJ does not hold any additional information for this church, more details about, and a good quality digital image of, the window would be very helpful.

Ware, Church of Saint Mary, 13th and 15th century with 19th century restoration. Saint James depicted with book, staff, bag and pilgrim hat on 14th/15th century font. Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings. The CSJ holds an article with pictures about the font, although a good quality digital image of the font would be very useful.

Also of interest:

13th century graffiti (including scallop shells) at Saint George’s Church, Anstey (CSJ holds a church leaflet).  See Ian Wood’s album on Flickr for an idea of how interesting this church is, also British Listed Buildings.

Piccotts End Cottages. Medieval wall paintings discovered in 1953, believed to be part of a pilgrim hospital connected with the House of Bonhommes at Ashridge.  See Dacorum Heritage Trust for details.  At present the building remains in private ownership, see BBC News item.

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Isle of Wight

East Cowes, Church of Saint James, built 1831, rebuilt 1864-8, chancel and chapel added 1870.   No known depictions of Saint James, some shell carvings on choir stalls. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, WikipediaChurch website and old Church website. Images can be found at Geograph.org.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Kingston, Church of Saint James, originally private chapel of De Kingston family, late 13th century, porch added 1766, remodelled 1872.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online. Image can be found at IOW FHS.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Ryde, Church of Saint James, 1827, 20th century alterations.   No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church website. Image can also be found at IOW FHS.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Yarmouth

Also of Interest:

Chale.  John Goodyear from Cheil is listed as the donor of a portable alabaster altarpiece to Santiago Cathedral in 1456.  Please see IOW Catholic History Society for information on this and on pilgrimage in, and from, the IOW in general.

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Kent

Bicknor, Church of Saint James.  12th century origin, substantially rebuilt/restored in 19th century by Bodley, unusual clunch interior.  No running water or electricity, situated amongst farms and orchards on North Downs. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British History Online, information and images at British Listed Buildings, Kent Churches and Parish Website.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Cooling, Church of Saint James, now redundant.  13th – 15th century, with some 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James, although the vestry is lined with cockle (not scallop) shells.  Cooling churchyard is famous for inspiring the opening scene of Great Expectations where Pip meets Magwitch.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wikipedia, Churches Conservation Trust and Cooling Church website has history here and gallery here.  CSJ holds a 2000 guidebook to the church, also an article in the Churches Conservation Trust Review and Report 2001-2.

Dover, Old Church of Saint James, now ruined.  11th century with 14th century addition that was used as a Court house for the Chancery and Admiralty Courts of the Cinque Ports, and for the Court of Lodemanage.  Although it was substantially restored and extended in the mid-1800s, it was not large enough to serve the parish and a new Church of Saint James was build further north on Maison Dieu Road in the 1860s.   The Old Church was damaged by a bomb in WWI and severely damaged by shelling in WWII, leading to the collapse of its tower in 1951.  The ruin was tidied and made safe, the bells being removed to the Church of All Saints in Shirley, Croydon.  Given the enormous damage sustained by the entire parish during WWII, the comparatively unscathed new Church of Saint James was declared redundant and demolished after the war  Information and images can be found at British Listed BuildingsDover-Kent.co.uk, Dover-freeuk.com and Doversociety.org.  Information about bells at Kent.Lovesguide.

East Malling, Church of Saint James.  Saxon origin, this building 12th century, substantially rebuilt 15th century.  Dedication changed from Saint Mary to Saint James after the Reformation. No known depictions of Saint James. Neighbouring hamlet of Larkfield Street is reported as having a St James’ Day Fair. Information can be found at British History Online, information and images at British Listed Buildings, Church Leaflet and Parish Website.  Many more images at Kent History Forum.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information about the Fair and change in dedication would be welcome.

Egerton, Church of Saint James.  13/14/15th century.  There is a suggestion that the dedication changed from Saint Mary to Saint James, any evidence for this would be very welcome. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British History OnlineBritish Listed Buildings and Kent Churches (with image of interior).  Image of exterior at Geograph.co.uk.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information about the change in dedication would be welcome.

Elmsted

Grain, Church of Saint James.  12th century with later medieval additions, altered 19th century and early 20th century tower. No known depictions of Saint James. Information at Kent Archaeology, information and images at British Listed BuildingsCliffe History and Kent History Forum.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Gravesend, Church of Saint James, now demolished. Built 1851 to deal with increasing population in Gravesend, it became a parish in its own right 1852 (taking over part of parish of Saint George).  Saint James then became the main parish church in 1952 and Saint George’s became a chapel of unity. Saint James was demolished in 1968 and Saint George’s reinstated as parish church.  See DiscoverGravesham and Kent.lovesguide.com for details.

Queenborough, Fair of James the Apostle (1368 charter)  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Kent 2007.

Royal Tunbridge Wells, Church of Saint James, built 1862 to deal with increasing population of the town.   No known depictions of Saint James. See Church Website and British Listed Buildings for details.  Images at Geograph.org.

Sheldwich, Church of Saint James.  First mentioned in 1070 as a chapel to the church of Faversham, this building dates from 12th century with later medieval additions including 15th century tower, altered and restored 19th century.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information at British Listed Buildings, British History Online, brief information and picture at Faversham.org.    Many more images at Geograph.org. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Staple, Church of Saint James the Great.  Believed to have Saxon origins (source evidence for this would be helpful), this building dates from 12th century with 14th century windows and a 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James, although the church has a beautiful Pilgrimage Window, installed in 2007 as a memorial to the organist Roger Burges. Information at British Listed Buildings, information, video and pictures at Village website.    Many more images, especially of window, at A Clerk of Oxford blog.  A fair on 25th July is mentioned in British History Online.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information on the origins of the church and the fair would be welcome.

Westgate & Garlinge, Church of Saint James, built 1872 to deal with increasing population of the town.   Saint James reported depicted in a stained glass window. See Kent Churches for details.  Images at Geograph.org.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, more information on the origins of the church and an image of the window would be welcome.

Also of interest:

Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Christ at Canterbury, established by Saint Augustine in 6th century, this building dates from 1070.  It became a major centre of pilgrimage after Saint Thomas Becket’s murder in 1170.  Pilgrims still travel the Pilgrim’s Way between Winchester and Canterbury, or Southwark and Canterbury.  See Cathedral website for more information.

 

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Lancashire

Some very meticulous research into the historic county of Lancashire was carried out in the 1990s by Michael Dickinson and his very useful notes are still on file.

Accrington, Church of Saint James.  Started as a chapel, possibly connected with a nearby monastic community, the building was confiscated as a chantry chapel at the Dissolution and sold back to the local community in 1553. It was often without its own minister and operated as a chapel of ease to Altham from 1717 to 1804. It was entirely rebuilt in 1763 and enlarged and altered in the 19th century.  It seems it may have been dedicated to Saint James at the time of the 1763 rebuilding – more information would be very welcome.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information at Wikipedia,  information and images at British Listed Buildings.

Altham, Church of Saint James.  Founded in 1140, and dedicated to Saint Mary, very little remains of the Norman church owing to a rebuilding in 1512, and construction of tower and restoration in 19th century.  The dedication to Saint James seems to have occurred at 1512 – further information would be most welcome.   Saint James is depicted in stained glass window (pilgrim hat, staff with gourd, book). Information at British History Online and British Listed Buildings, a PDF history of the church can be found on the Church Website.  Images (including window) on SJITBI Flickr group.  The CSJ holds a guide booklet for the church The Church At The Ford – A History of St James’ Church, Altham.

Blackburn, Church of Saint James.  Completed 1874.  No known depictions of Saint James. A PDF history of the church can be found on the Church Website, along with various images in the picture gallery.

Briercliffe, Church of Saint James.  Completed 1842.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia, some images of the church can be found on the Church Website.

Brindle, Church of Saint James.  12th century origins, the north chapel and tower are late medieval and the remainder of the church 19th century. Pre-Reformation it was dedicated to Saint Helen, and there is a holy well of Saint Helen south of the village.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information at Wikipedia and British Listed Buildings  information and images at Church Website.

Burnley, Church of Saint James.  Completed 1844, closed 1966 and partly demolished 1971, the tower and spire being knocked down in 1998 for a shopping centre.  Another Church of Saint James opened in March Street in 1966 but closed in 1989 when it was merged with Saint Andrew’s.  This building also appears to have been demolished.  Information at Wikipedia.

Chorley, Church of Saint James.  Founded 1878.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images at GENUKI.

Church, Church of Saint James. Late medieval tower, 1805 nave and 1895 chancel.  Foundation often ascribed to Saint Oswald in 7th century, but no evidence for this, the church is first recorded as a chapel in 1296.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information at British History OnlineBritish Listed Buildings and a Hyndburn Borough Council PDF conservation document regarding the history of the area.  Images on Lancashire Parish Clerks website.

Clayton-le-Moors, Saint James Church School.  Founded 1882 as a church with school for 300 children, closed 2007, now demolished.   Information and images at GENUKI.

Clitheroe, Church of Saint James.  Completed 1842.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and an image of the church at geograph.org.

Downham, Church of Saint Leonard.  15th century tower, remainder of church 1910.  Saint James depicted in stained glass window (staff with gourd, hat with shell).  Information can be found at Church website and images at SJITBI Flickr group.

Edgworth, Mission Church of Saint James.  No information, more details would be very welcome.   Image at GENUKI.

Haslingden, Church of Saint James.  A chapel has been on this site since at least the 13th century but it is not clear when it became dedicated to Saint James.  The medieval church was replaced in the 16th century but the structure collapsed in the 18th century due to burials inside the church and it was rebuilt again.  The tower and other alterations date from the 19th century. Saint James is depicted in a wall mosaic (staff with gourd and shell, bag).  Information can be found at British History OnlineBritish Listed Buildings and information and images (including the mosaic) at Church website.  Exterior images at SJITBI Flickr group.

Heysham, Church of Saint James.  Modern church/community centre dating from 1998, part of parish of Saint Peter.  More information welcome.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at Parish website.

Leyland, Church of Saint James.  1855  No known depictions of Saint James. Information at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Cof E website and GENUKI.

Lostock Hall, Church of Saint James.  1892, originally a mission church.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images at Church website and GENUKI.

Lower Darwen, Church of Saint James.  Founded 1826, rebuilt in 1969.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images at GENUKI.

Over Darwen, Church of Saint James.  First mentioned 1577, rebuilt in 1722, alterations/restorations in 19th and 20th centuries.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information at British History Online, British Listed Buildings and image at GENUKI.

Preston, Church of Saint James.  Built in 1838 as a Dissenting church, sold almost immediately to CofE as founding clergyman fell ill and it was not possible to meet the running expenses.  Demolished and rebuilt in 1960s on much smaller scale. No known depictions of Saint James. Information at Lancashire Parish Clerks website, information and images at Church website and GENUKI.

Scorton, RC Church of Saint Mary & Saint James.  Church was founded 1774 but this building is 1860-1. No known depictions of Saint James, although scallop shells decorate the exterior railings and Saint James’ coat of arms appears on the organ gallery. Information and images at British Listed Buildings and GENUKI.

Shireshead (Forton), Church of Saint James.  1889 built to replace the 16th century church of Saint Paul which had become inconveniently located.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and image from PDF at village website.

Stalmine, Church of Saint James.  A chapel has been on this site since at least the 13th century but it was not dedicated to Saint James until rebuilt in 1806.  Information can be found at British History Online,  and information and images at British Listed Buildings and Church website.

Stocks-in-Bowland (Dalehead), Church of Saint James.  1852.  As part of the work to build Stocks reservoir, the church was dismantled in 1937 and rebuilt in 1938 on a smaller scale at a different location. No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found in a PDF file at forestofbowland.org and an images of the church at geograph.org and dalehead.org.

Waterfoot, Church of Saint James.  Founded 1865, closed 1998, now occupied as a commercial premises.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images at British Listed Buildings and Rossendale Family History and Heraldry Society.

Westhead, Church of Saint James.  Built in 1851 to serve people in an outlying area of Ormskirk parish.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church website.  Image at geograph.org.

Whitechapel (Inglewhite) Church of Saint James.  A chapel has been on this site since medieval times, but it is not clear when it became dedicated to Saint James (sentence of consecration is dated 1818).  Rebuilt 1738, with further substantial 19th and 20th century alterations.  Information can be found at British History Online and British Listed Buildings, and information and images at Lancashire Parish Clerks.

Wrightington, Church of Saint James the Great.  Built in 1857.  Information and images can be found at British Listed BuildingsChurch website and GENUKI.

Also of Interest:

Fernyhalgh – RC Church of Saint Mary and Ladyewell Shrine.  Holy well and shrine has attracted pilgrims since at least the 11th century.  See http://ladyewellshrine.co.uk/ for information and images.

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Leicestershire (including Rutland)

Ab Kettleby, Church of Saint James the Greater.  13/14th century with restorations in the 19th century and in early 21st century (the church was closed for a while on health and safety grounds, but won the English Heritage Angel Award in 2013 for best repair or rescue of a place of worship).  No known depictions of Saint James, but a staff and pilgrim wallet are carved on the chancel screen. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, information at Historic England.    There is a holy well in the village, the waters of which were reputed to cure rheumatism.

Belton, Fair of Saint James by 1330 charter ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Rutland 2006.

Birstall, Church of Saint James the Great.  A church has probably been here since Saxon times, this building dates from 13th century with significant restoration in the 19th century and a large 1960s extension.  Saint James depicted in two stained glass windows.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, information at Parish Website.  Images of the stained glass would be very welcome.

Bottesford, Church of Saint Mary.  Medieval with much 19th C restoration. Contains a memorial brass of 1404 to Rector Henry de Codryngtoun which depicts eight saints, including Saint James as a pilgrim (hat with shell,book and staff).Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.  More information at church website.

Burton Lazars, Church of Saint James.  Late 12th century origins with further medieval additions and several 19th/20th century restorations.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information and multiple images can be found at British Listed Buildings, information at Church website   Church is believed to have been founded by Roger de Mowbray who also granted land to the Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem in mid-1100s.  This order, which had dual religious and military objectives (both the care of lepers under Augustinian rule, and the defence of Christian leper-houses in Palestine), established a hospital and their English headquarters at Burton, giving the village its modern name.

Coalville

  • Hugglescote, Church of Saint James, built on site of medieval chapel in 1776 but replaced in 19th century by larger church of Saint John the Baptist.  Information at Leicestershire Parish Councils and Wikipedia.
  • Snibston, Church of Saint James, 1915, closed in early 21st century and now a commercial premises.  Information at Wikipedia, image at geograph.org.

Dadlington, Church of Saint James the Greater.  13th century with significant restorations in the 19th century.  No known depictions of Saint James   Richard III is reputed to have drunk from the nearby well during the Battle of Bosworth, and after the battle many of the dead were brought to the church. A chantry was founded to pray for their souls in the early 1500s but suppressed in 1547.  Information at British Listed BuildingsGENUKI, Battlefieldstrust.com and Wikipedia.  Images at Geograph.org.

Drayton, Church of Saint James.  Medieval chapel which fell out of use at Reformation but was remodelled/rebuilt on smaller scale and turned into a mission church in 19th century by George Lewis Watson of Rockingham Castle.  Only 20 seats and no licence for marriages.  No known depictions of Saint James and date of dedication uncertain due to long period of disuse, more information would be welcome. Information and images at British Listed Buildings and Parish website.

Frisby (deserted medieval village), Chapel of Saint James.  First mentioned 1220, was still in existence in 1532 but disappeared by 1591. See Historic England website for details.

Huncote,  Information about history of village at Leicestershirevillages.com.

  • Chapel of Saint James, may have been in existence by 11th century, probably dependent on the church at Narborough, first reference to dedication is 1346.  In ruins by 1622, and excavated in 1990.   Information about excavation and history of chapel at Leicestershirevillages.com.
  • Church of Saint James, 1898, unfinished due to lack of funds. There is a wooden statute of Saint James, an image of this would be very welcome. See Leicestershire Churches.com for information and images of church and statue.

Launde Abbey, now a Christian retreat and conference centre.  Saint James is depicted as a pilgrim (hat and staff) in 19th century glass in the church.  Saint Roche is also depicted in the tracery of the east window.  Information about the Abbey here and on Wikipedia, and both windows can be seem in images on Tripadvisor here.

Leicester, Church of Saint James the Greater.  Wooden building erected in 1881, replaced by present structure in 1895.  Church website has details on history and a well-illustrated tour under the “Information” section.  Further information and images at British Listed Buildings.

Newbold Verdon, Church of Saint James.  Norman origin with significant restoration in the 19th century and a spire added in 1960.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Village Website.

Oaks-in-Charnwood, Church of Saint James the Greater.  A church was built on this site in 1815 as part of the terms of the enclosure of the forest by local landowners, it being thought that the agricultural development would bring many workers to the area.  The church was rebuilt in 1883.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and multiple images at British Listed Buildings and a detailed history at Charley Heritage website.

Sutton Cheney, Church of Saint James.  Foundation of church may be 11th century, this building mainly 13th century with later features and restorations. Saint James depicted as beardless youth with book, staff and gourd in 1905 stained glass. Richard III is reputed to have heard mass here before the Battle of Bosworth. Information and images at British Listed Buildings, Leicestershire Churches and Geograph.org.

Twycross, Church of Saint James the Great.  14th century with 15th century tower and 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James, but church is worth visiting simply to see some of the oldest stained glass in England (originally from France, given to church in 19th century).  Information at Historic England, information and images at British Listed Buildings and Professor Moriarty website.

Also of Interest:

Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Church of Saint Helen.  14th century with 15th and 19th century enlargements. Contains a 15th century alabaster tomb with a recumbent pilgrim figure, believed to be the brother of William, Lord Hastings.  Information and images at British Listed Buildings.

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Lincolnshire

The original research into Lincolnshire was carried out by Professor R B Tate. Having access to such high-quality material has made reviewing this section and uploading it onto the website a very enjoyable process.  All of Professor Tate’s notes have been retained in the office files.

Aslackby, Church of Saint James the Great.   The foundation date of this church is unknown, although the present building dates from around 1300 with later medieval additions, including a tower, and the chancel was rebuilt in the 19th century.  Recent archaeological excavations have revealed the presence of an earlier building, possibly a church, on the site.  For a time there were two churches in the village; the Knights Templar had a preceptory at Aslackby from the 12th century, with their own church dedicated to Saint John which was still in service up until the Reformation (Temple Farm now stands on this site). Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Parish Website and Wikipedia.  Images can be found at Geograph.org.  The CSJ holds various information and photographs for this church.

Boston – see The Story of Boston by Richard Gurnham, available as a Google e-book.

  • Gild of Saint James, in existence by 1389 see p. 14 of Guilds and Related Organisations in Great Britain and Ireland Part II  © Tom Hoffman.
  • Church of Saint Botolph, known as “the Boston Stump”, a major centre of pilgrimage in its own right in 14th and 15th centuries to visit the finger of Saint Anne and other relics owned by various guilds who had chapels within the church.   A memorial brass to Walter Pescod is reported to contain an image of Saint James.  More information/image please.  See Wikipedia and Parish Website for general information on the church.

Braceborough, Fair of James the Apostle, by charter 1271, to be held at the manor.  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Lincolnshire 2006.

Brigg,  Fair of Saint James, by charter 1235.  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Lincolnshire 2006.

Bullington (Goltho), Church of Saint James, now disappeared. The site is uncertain but a sensible theory has been out forward that the remains of this church in fact lie beneath the ruins of Goltho Chapel/Church of Saint George (redundant church which was seriously damaged by fire in 2013).  The theory – set out in detail in the Medieval Settlement Research Group Annual Report 1990 – postulates that Goltho is a later name which came into use in the later medieval period, and that it came to refer to the area where the medieval village of Bullington once stood.  Archaeological evidence of a larger stone church beneath the brick-built 16th century chapel supports this theory.

Burgh le Marsh, shrine and gild of St James established c. 1365 in the Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, reportedly as a thanksgiving by five local men for safe return from pilgrimage to Santiago. Shrine was destroyed in Reformation.  See Forward in Faith website for opening times/contact details for church, see p. 23 of  Guilds and Related Organisations in Great Britain and Ireland Part II  © Tom Hoffman.

Castle Bytham

  • Church of Saint James, was in existence by c.1100 when it was given to the Abbey of La Sauve Majeure. This building dates from late 12th century with various later additions and alterations.  Saint James is depicted in a 19th century window (the CSJ holds one black and white photo, a digital image for the Flickr group would be welcome).   See British Listed Buildings for information and images of the exterior.
  • Fair of James the Apostle, by grant 1253.  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Lincolnshire 2006.

Caythorpe, Fair of Saint James, by charter 1253, to be held at the manor.  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Lincolnshire 2006.

Crowland, Abbey.  Now ruined. Founded in 8th century, originally solely dedicated to Saint Guthlac, later dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint Bartholomew and Saint Guthlac.  The Abbey has been variously burned down and destroyed by Vikings over the years, this building dates from the 12th century with various later additions. A medieval stone figure of Saint James (staff with gourd and book) is set in a niche high up in the west facade, to the south of the window.  Information and images at Wikipedia, British Listed Buildings, Crowland Abbey Website and A Clerk of Oxford blog.   An important local pilgrimage centre in its own right containing the relics of Saint Guthlac and Waltheof, an Anglo-Danish Earl who was executed for rebelling against the Normans.  Hereward the Wake may also be buried here.  CSJ holds an old guide booklet and some black and white photographs.

Deeping St James, Church of Saint James, consecrated on Saint James’ Day 1139 as a daughter Priory of Thorney Abbey.   The monastic buildings have long since disappeared, only the church remains, 12th century with later additions, tower c.1730 and 19th century alterations.  A James Guild was mentioned in a will of 1530 but we have no further details of this. Information at Church Website, information and images at British Listed Buildings and Rob’s Churches Blog.   Church has been closed for restoration recently, suggest call ahead before visiting.  No known depictions of Saint James.   The CSJ holds some black and white photographs and a guide book.

Dorrington, Church of Saint James and Saint John.  13th century with later medieval additions and a 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. See British Listed Buildings and Rod Collin’s blog for information and an exterior image.

Dry Doddington, Church of Saint James.  12th century with later medieval additions and a 19th century restoration.  Modern painted figure of Saint James in church (book, staff, shells).  The tower leans westwards to a significant angle, possibly a bigger degree of lean than that tower in Pisa, and has recently had restoration work. See British Listed Buildings for information (photo attached to this is incorrect) and Parish Council website for information and lots of images.

East Allington, Chapel of Saint James, originally under control of the parish of Sedgbrook.  14th century, restored in 19th century and demolished in 1940s when the parishes of East and West Allington were united. Churchyard extant. See Genuki for information and images of churchyard and Parish Council website for information and old image of church.

Firsby, Church of Saint James, now disappeared.  A church was mentioned in the Domesday book and by the time it closed in 1786 it was dedicated to Saint James. Whether dedication was pre or post Reformation is unclear. Likely to have been situated in the deserted medieval village of West Firby. More information on site and dedication would be welcome.  See Parish Council website for information on church and on village history.

Frampton, Chantry Chapel of Saint James in Moulton Manor, endowed by Margery de Moulton c.1260. Manor/Chapel now longer exist, site is debated, one site is proposed on Gatehouse Gazeteer and one on Historic England.  More information welcome.

Freiston

  • Church of Saint James.  Formed from the nave of the church of the Priory of Saint James, founded in 1114 as a cell of Crowland Abbey through an endowment by Alan de Croun. Priory was one of the wealthiest at the Reformation, nothing remains of the Priory except the church. This building dates from mid-12th century, has an arcade of Norman arches, 15th century roof, bells and, remarkably, an elaborately-carved late 15th century font cover.  The Domesday Book mentions a church in Freiston, and the endowment charter of 1114 evidences that the church was already dedicated to Saint James, and indicates that it may have already been of some antiquity. See British Listed Buildings for details of the building, British History Online for details of the Priory and the Church Website for information and images.  CSJ holds a guide leaflet.
  • Fair of James. 1263 by charter,  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Lincolnshire 2006.

Gainsborough, Fair of James the Apostle, by charter 1242, to be held at the manor.  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Lincolnshire 2006.

Grimsby, The Minster and Parish Church of Saint James.  First mentioned in 1114, this building mainly dates from the 13th century with a 14th century crossing and 18th and 19th century rebuilding and restoration.  The building lost much of its stained glass during WWII bombing.  The church became a Minster in 2010. There is a stained glass image of Saint James (arab-style headdress, holding a church and staff). Also a figure of Saint James is reported in a modern metal reredos and in a painting.  More information please.   See British Listed Buildings for information and exterior images and Geograph.org for an image of the window.  The CSJ hold a guide leaflet.  The Minster Website has details of services and opening times.

Great Humby, Chapel of Saint James, 1400, as a Chapel of Ease at Great Humby manor.  Now vanished.  See Medieval Chapels in Lincolnshire (LHA vol 10 1975) by Dorothy M. Owen. It is speculated that the Chapel of Saint Anne (built as a private manorial chapel 1682 by the Brownlow family) may stand on the site. Great Humby Hall has long since disappeared, but the remaining (privately-owned and unconsecrated) Humby Chapel is occasionally used for services; see North Beltisloe Parishes website.  The CSJ holds a guide leaflet for Humby Chapel and history. Any further information on the earlier chapel would be welcome.

Helpringham, Fair of James, by charter 1259, to be held at the manor.  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Lincolnshire 2006.

Hundleby, Chapel of Saint James, long vanished, see Medieval Chapels in Lincolnshire (LHA vol 10 1975) by Dorothy M. Owen, and also Spilsby.

Ingoldsby, Chapel of Saint James at Holbecke by 1431, long vanished, see Medieval Chapels in Lincolnshire (LHA vol 10 1975) by Dorothy M. Owen.

Kirkby Laythorpe, Fair of James the Apostle, by charter 1246, to be held at the manor.  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Lincolnshire 2006 and Heritage Gateway website.

Lincoln

  • Hospital of Saint James recorded in Cathedral records.  Thought to have been taken over by Hospital of Holy Sepulchre which was given to the Ghilbertine Priory of Saint Katherine in the late 12th century and was based near the Priory and the Malandry (Hospital of Holy Innocents) at South Park.  Any further information would be welcome.  See Heritage Connect Lincoln for details.
  • Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary.  Life of Saint James reported in medieval glass.  More information needed.  Cathedral also holds a 1522 version of The Pilgrimage of Robert Langton, a Doctor of Civil Law who travelled widely in Europe and the Near East, visiting Santiago, Rome and Jerusalem.

Long Sutton, c.1524 bequests were made regarding various altar lights, including one for “St Jamys”.  See p.119 of Church and Society in Medieval Lincolnshire, 1990, by Dorothy M. Owen.

Louth, Church of Saint James, in existence from at least 1200.  There was possibly a Saxon church here, probably dedicated to Saint Herefrith who was thought to have been martyred by the Danes in 873.  Further research on this earlier church is currently underway, an unusual Saxon cross having been excavated recently in the churchyard.  The present building dates from around 1430, the spire (the tallest of any medieval parish church in the country) was consecrated in 1515.  A 19th century restoration left the church substantially unaltered.  Information at Church Website, Heritage Gateway and Wikipedia, information and images at British Listed Buildings.   Figure of Saint James, believed to be modern, with staff reported in south aisle.   The CSJ holds some black and white photographs and a guide book.

Moulton Chapel, Chapel of Saint James.  A chapel was first recorded in 1259, although the dedication to Saint James was not mentioned until 1410.  This chapel disappeared in the mid-17th century.  A new octagonal chapel was built in 1722 as a chapel of ease to All Saints Moulton, possibly on the same site.  Restored in 19th century. See Medieval Chapels in Lincolnshire (LHA vol 10 1975) by Dorothy M. Owen, South Holland Life website and British Listed Buildings for information. Exterior image at Geograph.org.  CSJ holds various black and white photographs.

Nuncotun, Chapel of Saint James, established before 1183, possibly connected with the Cistercian nunnery of Coatham.  No longer exists. See Medieval Chapels in Lincolnshire (LHA vol 10 1975) by Dorothy M. Owen and Pastscape.org.

Rauceby, Chapel of Saint James, manorial chapel, now disappeared.  Recorded as belonging to Shelford Priory in 1536, derelict by 1640. See Medieval Chapels in Lincolnshire (LHA vol 10 1975) by Dorothy M. Owen and British History Online.

Rigsby with Ailby, Church of Saint James. Of Norman origin, the church was described as a “small mean thatched edifice” in 1834 (p.167 of The History of the County of Lincoln From the Earliest History to the Present Time by John Saunders, Jnr.)  It was rebuilt in 1863.   See GENUKI and British Listed Buildings for information, a short video tour on YouTube and more images and information at Geograph.org.  CSJ holds black and white images.

Rodemill, Chapel of Saint James the Apostle, now disappeared, exact location unknown but believed to be between Bassingham and Norton Disney. The foundation date is unknown, but was in existence by 1155-60 when it was gifted to Newsham Abbey.  See Heritage Gateway for details.

Skendleby, Chapel of Saint James, now disappeared.  Manorial chapel given to Bardney Abbey before 1200 by Robert de Gaunt. Abandoned by 1460.  Site rediscovered in 2003 and excavated in 2005.See Medieval Chapels in Lincolnshire (LHA vol 10 1975) by Dorothy M. Owen, The Mystery of St James Skendleby by Skendleby Heritage Society (CSJ has a copy) and Heritage Gateway for information.

Skillington, Church of Saint James. 11th century origin with various later additions and alterations.  Many interesting old features, no known depictions of Saint James. See British Listed Buildings for information and images.

Spilsby  

  • Church of Saint James.   A College of Priest and Trinity Chantry Chapel was set up in 1347, by the Willoughby family, in connection with a Church they had built there, near the existing Chapel at Spilsby (possibly the Chapel of Saint James at Hundleby?).  See British History Online and Bolingbroke Team Ministry. Eventually this became the Church of Saint James, which has a 16th century tower and was substantially rebuilt in 1879. See British Listed Buildings for details and many images.  Saint James depicted on wooden pulpit (hat, shells, staff, gourd), date of dedication of Church not clear.  CSJ holds a guide leaflet and some black and white photographs.
  • Fair of James granted to John Beke by charter in 1255, to be held at the manor, reaffirmed in 1305.   ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Lincolnshire 2006.   This Fair and the Monday market may have been associated with the Chapel at Hundleby; see p.19 of Church and Society in Medieval Lincolnshire, 1990, by Dorothy M. Owen.

Sutton St James, Church of Saint James. 15th century origin, the nave was destroyed during Cromwell’s Protectorate. Despite some rebuilding in the 19th and 20th centuries.  No known depictions of Saint James. See British Listed Buildings for details of the chancel and tower, and GENUKI for information and Geograph.org for images.

Temple Bruer, Fair of James the Apostle, by charter to Brother Amadeus of the Order of the Knights Templar, 1259, to be held at the manor.  ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Lincolnshire 2006.  The south tower of the preceptory remains as part of a farm, images and information can be found at Geograph.org and a interesting animated recreation of the site at Heritage Lincolnshire.

Thornton Abbey, Chapel of Saint James attached to the hospital “without the walls”, in existence by 1322, now disappeared.  Information at British History Online and Pastscape. The hospital/chapel site is being excavated by the University of Sheffield’s Department of Archaeology, further information on the ongoing investigations at Thornton Abbey Project.  The remaining ruins, including the magnificent gatehouse, are in the care of English Heritage.

Winthorpe, Gild of Saint James, established 1361, see p. 23 of  Guilds and Related Organisations in Great Britain and Ireland Part II  © Tom Hoffman.

Woolsthorpe by Belvoir, Church of Saint James. Original church (dedicated to Saint Mary?) is believed to have stood to the south of the current village, and was used to site an artillery battery, and then burned down by Parliamentary soldiers in the Civil War. Rebuilt on different site in 19th century.  Saint James depicted in stained glass with shell. See Wikipedia and GENUKI for information and Geograph.org for images of the church and the window.  More information on the dedication of the original church would be helpful.

Also of interest:

Ansgot of Burwell founded a priory at Burwell around 1110.  He had made a pilgrimage to Santiago and was so impressed by the hospitality at the Abbey of La Sauve Majeure near Bordeaux that he decided to gift this house the church at Burwell, its chapel at Austhorpe, the churches at Carlton, Muckton and Walmsgate, plus some land.  Details about the priory here and on the foundation and later charters here. The Austhorpe chapel has been referred to as a chapel of Saint James but the medieval church here (now sadly demolished although the churchyard remains) seems to have been dedicated to Saint Margaret.  Further information on the chapel/church dedication would be welcome.   CSJ has black and white photographs of church and Austhorpe chapel site.

Belton, Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, estate church to Belton House.  Marble monument to Caroline, Countess Brownlow (d.1824) has a pilgrim staff and hat with shell.   CSJ has a black and white photograph.  See http://beltonchurch.uk/the-church/ for details of church and visiting times.

Spalding, Church of Saint Mary and Saint Nicholas. 13th century. Saint James reported in stained glass, more information please. See British Listed Buildings for information and images.

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Merseyside & The Wirral

Many thanks to Ann Clark and Michael Dickinson for their respective work in the 1990’s on Cheshire and the historic counties of Lancashire.  Where possible their notes have been retained on our files.

Birkdale, Church of Saint James.   1857, no known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website, exterior images at Geograph.org.

Birkenhead

  • Benedictine Priory of Saint James, founded c. 1150.  Only the late 12th century Chapter House now remains intact and is now used as a chapel.  This was restored in the 19th century and has an early 20th century Comper window depicting Saint James with staff and gourd. Information about the priory can be found at British History Online and about the Chapter House here and the ruins here. The site also contains the tower of the 19th century Saint Mary’s Church which closed in 1974, information at Wikipedia, Wirral Peninsula and Wirral Globe. An interesting image and map-rich guide to the priory is on Wirral BC website. CSJ holds some postcards of the Chapter House exterior and interior, a photocopy of the Priory Seal which depicts Saint James, plus a photocopy of the 13-page article Birkenhead Priory: A Closer Look by Caroline M. Croasdale.  Further images of the Chapter House and Comper window would be helpful.
  • Church of Saint James.   19th century, built to serve the growing population of dock workers. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia, and images at CofE website.    CSJ holds a 1969 centenary pamphlet for this church, images, especially of interior, would be helpful.

Bootle

  • RC Church of Saint James.  1885, no known depictions of Saint James. Information and image can be found at British Listed Buildings.  Further information on this church would be welcome.
  • Church of Saint John & Saint James.   Built in Monfa Road in 1910, demolished in 2010 and replaced in 2015 by a modern building on Bailey Drive. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images of old building can be found at GENUKI and Church Website, details of new building at Church Website.

Eccleston Park, Church of Saint James.   1922, no known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at CofE website and GENUKI.  More information would be welcome.

Haydock, Church of Saint James the Great.   1866, built to cater for increased population due to expanding coal mining industry.  There have been several remodellings/extensions of the building in the 19th and 20th centuries.  Saint James is depicted in stained glass window (beardless, with staff, wallet and shell), and in a statue (staff, gourd and shell). The Church Website is extremely comprehensive and informative, and has a detailed history, a tour and a stained glass section.

Liverpool

  • Church of Saint Matthew and Saint James, Mossley Hill.   1875, no known depictions of Saint James. Contains a “Father” Willis organ and was the first church to be bomb-damaged in WWII.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website, information and exterior image at Wikipedia.
  • Saint James’ Cemetery, now Saint James’ Gardens.  Named after the nearby Church of Saint James – see next entry. This area was a quarry until 1825, a cemetery until 1936 and became an urban park in 1972.  See St James Cemetery Website, BBC Website and Wikipedia for information and images.
  • Church of Saint James, Upper Parliament Street, built in 1775, partly financed by slave traders.   Believed to be one of the oldest surviving example of a cast-iron structure in the country.  Closed in the 1970s but reopened in 2011 owing to local regeneration.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Church records provide important evidence of the lives of black people in Liverpool in the 18th and 19th centuries.  For information and images, see Church Website, BBC News and British Listed Buildings.
  • Church of Saint James, West Derby, built in 1846 with chancel added in 1879, the spire was removed in the 1970s due to structural problems and the whole building was substantially remodelled in the 1990s.   No known depictions of Saint James.   For information see Church Website and British Listed Buildings.  Image at Geograph.org.

Maghull, Church of Saint James, modern.  Little information available (see CofE website for address and images) – more would be welcome.

New Brighton, Church of Saint James.   19th century by Sir G G Scott. No known depictions of Saint James, but has A O Hemmings wall-paintings and stained glass by Camm. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings , Wirral History & Heritage Association and Parish Website.   The CSJ does not hold any other information or images relating to this church, more would be helpful.

Rainhill, Methodist Church of Saint James, 1858.  Little information available (see Church Website and GENUKI for information and images) – more would be welcome.

Woolton, Methodist/URC Church of Saint James, 1866.  See Church Website for information and images.  CSJ holds a photocopy of An Outline History of the Methodist Society at Woolton by F. Gordon Salmon.  More information would be welcome.

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Oxfordshire

A big thank you to Michael Mooney for a lot of work on research on, and for generously providing many images and guide books for, this county.

Adderbury, Church of Saint Mary the Virgin.   Early 13th century with later additions and 19th century restorations.  Saint James depicted on stone reredos (19th century carving to replace images removed during the Reformation).  See Church Website for information and images, and SJITBI Flickr group for images.  The Church contains some interesting medieval carvings of musicians.  CSJ holds a colour guide booklet.

Aston, Church of Saint James.   1839, with spire added and other alterations in late 19th century.  Saint James in stained glass window (staff with gourd, hat with shell, book). Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia. CSJ holds some photographs of this church, images at SJITBI Flickr group.

Bampton, Church of Saint Mary.   Saxon in origin, significantly rebuilt/altered in 12th/13th/14th/15th centuries, with extensive 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in 14th century stone reredos (staff and pilgrim bag). Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website. CSJ holds a b/w postcard of the reredos and a brief guide leaflet for the church, images of church exterior and reredos can be seen at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Beckley, Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary.   12th century in origin, significantly rebuilt in 14th/15th century, with 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in medieval stained glass (staff, bag and hat). The church also has a wealth of other original features including wall paintings. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings .  Images at Geograph.org at SJITBI Flickr Group (including the window).  CSJ holds an indistinct colour photograph of the window and a colour guide booklet for the church.

Bignell, Fair of Saint James,1377, by charter ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Oxfordshire 2005.

Bix, this was originally a Saxon village dispersed into two areas – Bix Brand and Bix Gibwyn.  Both areas had a church, Bix Brand the church of Saint James which dates from the 12th century, and Bix Gibwyn the church of Saint Michael which was probably of similar date.  These became separate parishes in the 13th century but were united again in the 15th century although both churches appear to have remained in use for a time.  The church of Saint Michael disappeared completely by 1754 and its site has recently been located by diligent archaeological work (see here for details), the church of Saint James was unroofed and abandoned in 1874 when the structure became unsafe.  A new church of Saint James was built in the more modern Bix village centre.  See British History Online for details.

  • Church of Saint James, now ruined.  Norman, left unroofed in 1874.  Restoration work is now being carried out to make the ruins safe for visitors.  For information and images see British Listed Buildings and the article  ‘The Churches of Bix’, Oxoniensa, 1, 1936 p.129-139 by E.A. Greening Lamborn Oxoniensia.org PDF.  For details of the recent restoration project see the Henley Standard.
  • Church of Saint James, 1874, to replace the dilapidated medieval church.  The site was moved to the more populous centre of Bix village. No known depictions of Saint James.  Church contains some 16th century stained glass taken from the ruined church of Saint James.  This originally came from Sheen Angorum Charterhouse in Leuven, Belgium, and was put in the old church in the early 1800s.  For information and images see British Listed Buildings.

Photographs of both churches can be seen at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Bloxham, Church of Saint Mary.   Late 12th century in origin, significantly rebuilt/altered in 13th/14th/15th centuries, with 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted (with other apostles) in 14th century stone carving in hood mould round the now unused west door (hat, staff, possibly shell on hat and scrip). Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia, and information and multiple images at Great English Churches Website. The CSJ holds A Guide and History of the Church by Yvonne Huntriss, M.B.E. An up-to-date digital image of the carving for the Flickr group would be useful to confirm correct identification.

Bourton (Vale of White Horse), Church of Saint James, 1860.  Very limited information and images can be found at Oxford Villages Website and Wikipedia. No known depictions of Saint James. Any further information or up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome.

Brightwell-cum-Sotwell, Church of Saint James.   A chapel was first mentioned at Sotwell in 1154, first dependent on the Church of Saint Lucian in Wallingford, then transferred to the Church of Saint Leonard after the Black Death.   The chapel was united with the Church of Saint Agatha in Brightwell in 1865 to form the parish of Brightwell-cum-Sotwell.  The medieval church was rebuilt in 1884 painstakingly re-using original features like the 14th century oak roof. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Oxfordshire Historic Churches Trust. Images of exterior can be found at Geograph.org.

Burford, Church of Saint John the Baptist.   Norman in origin with later medieval additions and a 19th century restoration. The head of Saint James is depicted in medieval stained glass window (hat with shell, staff). Information and images of church can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website (includes an image of the window in the Gallery). A very clear image of window can be found at Vidimus Website. CSJ holds a guide to the church and images can be seen at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Chalgrove, Church of Saint Mary.   May be early 12th century in origin, the building mainly dates from early 13th century with later medieval additions and 19th/20th century roof. There are significant and well-preserved early 14th century wall paintings which include depictions of the Apostles, although Saint James is not identifiable.  Conservation work has recently been carried out. The church also has a chapel of Saint James to commemorate the now disappeared church of Saint James at Warpsgrove (see below), and a grass labyrinth shaped like a scallop shell. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website, and information and multiple images at Geograph.org.  The CSJ also holds a variety of small leaflets on the church and the paintings, and a copy of An Illustrated Guide to the Medieval Wall Paintings in the Church of Saint Mary the Virgin at Chalgrove in the County of Oxfordshire by R W Heath-Whyte.  Images can be seen at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Chinnor, Church of Saint Andrew.   13th century in origin with later medieval additions and a 19th century restoration. Saint James is depicted in an oil painting (hat slung on back, staff with gourd) believed to be a cartoon for Westminster Abbey great rose window painted by Sir James Thornhill in 1722. Information and images of church can be found at British Listed Buildings . An image of the painting can be found at Vidimus Website, and details about the cartoons at amershamhistory.info.  Images can be seen at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Claydon with Clattercote, Church of Saint James.   12th century origins, significant 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online. Images of exterior can be found at Geograph.org.  CSJ holds some photographs of the church although up-to-date images for the Flickr group would be welcome.

Combe Longa, Church of Saint Laurence.   Built 1395.  15th century stained glass window of Saint James (hat with shell, staff and bag), plus a more modern window with Saint James in it (hat with shell, staff and gourd)  Saint James is also depicted in a medieval Doom painting over the chancel arch (hat with shell, staff and bag). Information on church can be found at British Listed Buildings . Images can be seen at SJITBI Flickr group.  The CSJ holds a colour guide booklet for the church.

Cowley, Church of Saint James.   12th century origins, significant 19th century restoration.  No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings , Church Website and British History Online. Image of exterior can be found at Geograph.org.

Denchworth, Church of Saint James.   12th century origins, later medieval additions, significant 19th century restoration. Saint James depicted in 19th century Morris & Co stained glass (staff, gourd, Cruz Espada. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and information at British History Online.  Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.  The CSJ holds an informative guide booklet.

Fulbrook, Church of Saint James the Great.   12th century origins, 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted with book and pilgrim staff in stained glass window. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and wasleys.org.uk. CSJ holds a guide booklet and some photographs of the church, images can also be seen at SJITBI Flickr group.

Iffley, Church of Saint Mary the Virgin.   Built 1175 – 89 with 19th century restorations.  Many original Romanesque carvings survive, church is well worth a visit for these alone. Christ depicted as a pilgrim (staff, hat with 2 shells) in 19th century stained glass windows. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings , Church Website and Great English Churches. Images at SJITBI Flickr Group.  CSJ holds a guide booklet.

Little Milton, Church of Saint James, built 1844 with an 1861 tower.  For images and information see British Listed Buildings and Sacred Destinations.  No known depictions of Saint James.

Lower Heyford, Church of Saint Mary.   Saxon in origin, this building dates mainly from 14th and 15th centuries with 19th century restoration.  Many original features survive, church is well worth a visit for these alone. Saint James depicted as a pilgrim (hat with shell, staff, cloak decorated with shells) in 1916 century stained glass window. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Britain Express. Images can be seen at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Over Norton, Church of Saint James, no information, any details welcome!  Image of exterior of cottage-style church at geograph.org.

Oxford

  • All Souls College Chapel.  Founded 1438. Stained glass 1441-47 by John Glazier contains image of Saint James as a pilgrim (hat, staff, book, bag) – image at therosewindow.  CSJ holds indistinct photograph.  Saint James also reported in tracery but evidence awaited.
  • Lincoln College Chapel.  Built 1629-31. Stained glass from same time by Abraham van Linge contains image of Saint James as a pilgrim (hat with shell, staff with gourd, book) – image at college website.  CSJ holds indistinct photograph.
  • Merton College Chapel.  Dates from 1262. Circa 1300 stained glass contains image of Saint James with staff and book – image at therosewindow.  Saint James is also reported depicted on a 1471 memorial brass to warden Henry Sever – more details/image please.
  • New College Chapel.  Founded 1379. Stained glass 1380-86 by Thomas Glazier contains image of Saint James as a pilgrim (hat, staff) – image at therosewindow.  Saint James is also depicted in the stone reredos (hat and staff with gourd) – images of the reredos can be found at Fr Laurence Lew, O.P.’s Flickr photostream, and information about the reredos and Nathaniel Hitch’s figures, including an image of the Saint James figure, in a New College pdf. Saint James also reported in 18th century tracery but evidence awaited.  The college owns a painting of Saint James by El Greco (no specific attributes), this is on long term loan to the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford – image here.
  • Saint James’ Hall stood on site of Pembroke College in 1440. See British History Online for further details
  • Saint John’s College Chapel.  Dates from 1555.  1871 Clayton & Bell stained glass contains image of Saint James with staff and book – image at Fotolibra.

Nether Worton, Church of Saint James.   12th century origins, 1630 tower, 19th century restoration.  Short chancel, original appears to have been demolished at some time. No known depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings , CRSBI Website and British History Online.

Radley, Church of Saint James the Great.   13th century origins as a chapel to Saint Helen’s, Abingdon, early 20th century restoration.  North aisle and transept destroyed in Civil War. Saint James depicted on painted wooden reredos of 1909 (hat with shell, staff with gourd, book). Information at British History Online, information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and CRSBI Website.  Further images on SJITBI Flickr Group.   Church is on route of the Thames Pilgrim Way.

Ramsden, Church of Saint James. 1872.  No depictions of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Village Website.  CSJ holds two colour photographs and a brief guide leaflet, plus images at SJITBI Flickr group.

Rousham, Church of Saint Leonard and Saint James. Dedicated to Saint Germanus in 1328, to Saint Helen in 1846, to Saint James in 1864 and to Saint Leonard and Saint James in 1904. No known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wikipedia and British History Online.  Images at geograph.org.

Sarsden, Church of Saint James, 1760, closed 1992.  See Churchill & Sarsden website and British Listed Buildings.

Somerton, Church of Saint James.  Norman origins with later additions and 19th century restoration. Saint James depicted in a stained glass window (staff, scroll, scallop shell). There is also a c.1400 reredos includes the Apostles but no distinguishing symbols.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online, information and images can be found at Village Website and CRSBI Website.  CSJ holds a guide leaflet and booklet, and various colour photographs, images can be seen at SJITBI Flickr Group.

South Leigh, Church of Saint James.  Norman origins with 12th century nave, 15th century tower and 19th century restorations. Saint James (head with hat and shell) is depicted in fragments of 15th century stained glass in the east window of north chapel. The church also has many 14th/15th century murals which were uncovered during the 19th century restorations and is well worth a visit for these alone.  Information can be found at British Listed BuildingsBritish History Online and Wikipedia, information and images can be found at Painted Church and CRSBI Website.  CSJ holds a guide leaflet and various colour photographs and images (including stained glass) at SJITBI Flickr group.

South Weston, Church of Saint Lawrence, 1860.  Saint James depicted as a pilgrim on altar mosaic. Images at Oxfordshire Churches and Chapels.   CSJ holds some colour photographs, up-to-date images for the Flickr group would be welcome.

Stanton Harcourt, Church of Saint Michael, 12th century onwards.  Saint James depicted in early medieval stained glass (holding a scroll “Jacobus”).  One of the churches in the Oxford Diocese Pilgrim Project.  Information at British Listed Buildings, images (including window) at SJITBI Flickr group.  CSJ holds a comprehensive guide booklet.

Stonesfield, Church of Saint James the Great.  Church has been here since early 13th century, 15th century tower and 19th and 20th century restorations/additions. Saint James is depicted in stained glass (staff, shell and scroll) and a banner (staff and shell). There is also a 20th century wrought iron screen with shell decoration.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online, information and images at Church Website. CSJ holds various colour photographs/postcards and a brief guide leaflet, and images are available on SJITBI Flickr Group.

Warpsgrove, Church of Saint James.  Thought to have been built in the 12th century by the Foliot family.   The village was abandoned in the mid-fifteenth century and it is likely that the church became disused at the same time.  The ruins stood until around 1780.  Information can be found in a Victoria County History volume which will be published later this year and at Oxfordshire Churches and Chapels.

West Hanney, Church of Saint James.  Existed by 1086, this building has a 12th century nave with later medieval additions and 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in stained glass (hat with shell, boots, staff with water bottle, book). Information and images can be found at British Listed BuildingsBritish History Online and CRSBI Website.  CSJ holds a guide booklet “A Short History of Hanney” and further images can be found at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Also of interest:

The Thames Pilgrim Way path from Radcot to Runnymede http://www.thamespilgrimway.org.uk/

Oxford Diocese Pilgrim Project – includes 15 churches of special spiritual significance in the diocese, including some already listed on this page. Information here and map here.

Binsey, “Treacle Well” and Church of Saint Margaret of Antioch.  A medieval healing well connected with Saint Frideswide.  See Thames Pathway website and CofE website.

Cowley, Church of Saint Luke, now the Oxfordshire History Centre. Reported to have a modern figure of Saint James above the altar, but uncertain whether this has survived conversion to a museum.

Dorchester on Thames, the Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul.  Was the seat of a bishopric from 634 when Saint Birinus was sent by Pope Honorius I, until the see was transferred to Lincoln in 1085.  The Abbey was founded in 1140 and became an important pilgrimage site when the remains of Saint Birinus were transferred from Worcester in 1225.   See Wikipedia for information.

Oxford

  • Christ Church Cathedral, originally the church of Saint Frideswide’s Priory and a centre of pilgrimage.  See University of Rochester website and Wikipedia.
  • Magdalen College Chapel, 1474-80.  Saint James reported in 19th century tracery, evidence awaited.
  • Pusey House Chapel, Saint James reported depicted on a roof boss, evidence awaited.
  • The Queen’s College Chapel.  Founded 1341, the chapel was rebuilt in 17th/18th centuries. Saint James is reported in 15th century glass reset in 1717,and in glass by Abraham van Linge – more details/image please.
  • Saint Ebbe’s Church, mainly 19th century.  Saint James is reported in a 15th century stained glass roundel – evidence awaited.
  • Saint Peter’s College Chapel, (Church of Saint Peter-le-Bailey).  Saint James reported in 1880 Henry Holiday window, evidence awaited.
  • Wadham College Chapel Saint James reported in 1616 stained glass window, evidence awaited.

South Newington, Church of Saint Peter ad Vincula.  12th century with many later additions/restorations. Saint James may be depicted in wall painting c.1340, although this figure has also been identified as Saint Michael.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online, information and images can be found at Village WebsitePainted Church and CRSBI Website.  CSJ holds a church guide and colour photograph of the painted figure, and images can be seen at SJITBI Flickr Group.

Wroxton, Wroxton Abbey, Saint James reported in stained glass, evidence awaited.

Yarnton, Church of Saint Bartholomew, Saint James reported in stained glass, evidence awaited.

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Somerset

Ashwick, Church of Saint James.   First mentioned early 15th century, chapel of ease to Kilmersdon.  This building has c.1450 tower, remainder rebuilt in 19th century.  No known images of Saint James. The Fosse Way passes on eastern boundary of parish. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia..  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Bath, Church of Saint James (no longer exists).   It is thought that the first church was Saxon.  This building was converted into a private chapel for the Bishop’s Palace in the 13th century, and a new parish church of Saint James being built in a different location.  The church was rebuilt in a striking Italianate style in the 19th century but was severely damaged in an air raid in 1942 and subsequently demolished.  Information and images can be found at freshford.com, southernwalks.co.uk and Bath Past.   CSJ holds some clippings of articles about the 19th century church.  Church was associated with South Gate which led to the Fosse Way.

Beercrocombe, Church of Saint James.   13/14/15th century with 19th century restoration.  No known images of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Village Website..  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Butleigh, Church of Saint Leonard.  Saxon origins, this building mainly 14th and 19th century.  Saint James is reported in early stained glass – more information and images please.  Information  can be found at British Listed Buildings and CofE Website.  Image of church at Dawsonheritage.co.uk.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Cameley, Church of Saint James (now redundant).   12th century with 15th century west tower.  No known images of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and information and images at the Churches Conservation Trust .  More images at Dawsonheritage.co.uk. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Chard, Fair of Saint James, prescriptive but confirmed to the burgesses by charter in 1271 ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Somerset 2010.

Charlton Musgrove, Stavordale Priory (1243 – 1539), dedicated to Saint James. Priory seal depicted Saint James with staff, book, scrip and shell (image here). Altar of Saint James reported in 1374. Now owned by Sir Cameron Mackintosh.  See British History Online and Wikipedia for details/image.

Chillington, Church of Saint James.   Possibly built on prehistoric site, originated in 13th century as dependent chapel of South Petherton.  Later medieval additions and 19th and 20th century restorations.  No known images of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online, image at Geograph.org.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Chilton Cantelo, Church of Saint James.  Believed to have Norman origins (12th century font is earliest part of this building), 15th century tower, 19th century restoration  Later medieval additions and 19th and 20th century restorations.  No known images of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and image by Eugene Birchall at Geograph.org.  Church is associated with the rather curious tale of Theophilus Broome, a Parliamentarian who lived in fear of post-mortem punishment under the Restoration, such as that meted out to Oliver Cromwell. To avoid his body being disturbed and his head displayed on a pike he arranged for his body to be interred at Saint James’ and his head to be kept at Higher Farm across the street, where it remains to this day, with associated spooky tales about various attempts to reunite body and skull – see here. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

East Brent, Church of Saint Mary the Blessed Virgin.  15/17th century with 19th century restoration. Saint James depicted in stained glass window.  Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at greatenglishchurches website and image of window at therosewindow website.  An image of the window would be helpful.

East Lambrook, Church of Saint James.   12th century origins, with later additions until 18th century and 19th century restoration.  No known images of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website, more images of exterior and churchyard at www.maryjane-sue.co.uk.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Farleigh Hungerford, Church of Saint Leonard.  15th century with 19th century remodelling. Saint James depicted in stained glass window (staff with gourd, bag, book).  Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings, and image of window at therosewindow website.  CSJ has a photograph of the window but a good digital image of the window would be helpful.  There is a suggestion that Saint James was once depicted in a border of a ceiling painting, is this still extant?  More information please.

Fitzhead

  • Church of Saint James, previously dedicated to Saint Mary Magdalene, change in dedication sometime after 1848 – see British History Online.   15th century tower, remainder 19th century.  No known images of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Village Website. CSJ holds a guide sheet and a notelet illustration.
  • Churchyard Cross, 14th century, top part of shaft and lantern replaced in early 20th century, Saint James depicted on north side of lantern.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and image on Village Website, and close up image of lantern on Flickr.

Glastonbury

  • Chapel of Saint James, late 15th century slipper chapel for Glastonbury Abbey, now converted to a private house named Jacoby Cottage.  For information see British Listed Buildings, for information and location see British History Online and glastonburyantiquarians.org, for images see Pastscape and Flickr.  Image of building for CSJ records would be welcome.
  • Abbey.  Founded in Saxon times, and the coronation and burial site of Saxon kings, Glastonbury grew to become the second wealthiest abbey in the country, partly because of the great number of pilgrims who came to visit the many relics and possibly the holy thorn (first mention of this is early 16th century).  Glastonbury was also one of the most inventive abbeys when it came to pilgrimage, not only did it claim possession of a variety of relics which were in fact disputed by other religious institutions (such as the relics of Saint Dunstan), but in 1191 it announced the discovery of the tomb of King Arthur.  Information about the abbey can be found at Wikipedia and Glastonbury Abbey website.  Please note that pilgrims are welcome to attend services at the abbey (still held weekly at Saint Patrick’s Chapel), and there is an annual pilgrimage to the abbey, see glastonburypilgrimage for details.
  • George Hotel and Pilgrims’ Inn, 15th century pilgrim hospice, still a pub, restaurant and hotel.  For information see British Listed Buildings and for information and image see Wikipedia and georgeandpilgrim website.
  • Chapel of Saint Margaret and Almhouses. Thought to have originated in 13th century as a pilgrim hospice, later almshouses.   See British Listed Buildings (where it is listed as Saint Mary Magdalene’s) and Small Pilgrim Places Network for details.  Further information/evidence on origins welcome.
  • Holy wells.  There are two wells in Glastonbury. Please note the Chalice Holy Well is unlikely to have been a medieval holy well but seems to have been a standard water source for the abbey which has much later become the focus of legends about Joseph of Arimathea and Arthur owing to its red water.  Similarly, the White Spring is in fact a Victorian reservoir built on the site of a natural spring, again no evidence is available regarding this as a medieval holy well.

Langport, Church of All Saints (now redundant).   Some of church 12/13th century, most is 15/16th century with 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in medieval stained glass with pilgrim hat, staff and book. Information about church can be found at British Listed Buildings and information and images at the Churches Conservation Trust .  Therosewindow website has a picture of the window here and a close up of the Saint James pane here. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Long Sutton, Fair of Saint James, by charter 1267 ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Somerset 2010.

Milton Clevedon, Church of Saint James.  Church has existed here from 12th century although building mainly dates from 1790 rebuild and extensive 19th century restoration. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings.  There is a medieval niche with restored carvings of the Virgin and Saint James, although this would appear to be Saint James the Less with book and club – see Britainexpress website for image.  Further information on dedication history (Saint James dedication first mentioned in 1545 – see British History Online) would be welcome.  Image of church on Geograph.org.   CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Old Cleeve, Fair of Saint James, by letter patent 1466, granted to abbot of Cleeve Abbey to be held at the manor ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Somerset 2010.

Preston Plucknett (Yeovil), Church of Saint James.   Built in 1420 as a chapel to Saint John the Baptist, Yeovil, substantial 19th century restoration.  No known images of Saint James. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.  15th century cross in churchyard, weathered lantern now displayed in church, see British Listed Buildings.  Image at Geograph.org. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Regil, Church of Saint James. Built 19/20th century as a mission church to the parish of Winford. No known images of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at Parish Website. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Southstoke, Church of Saint James. Built 12th century with 15th and 19th century alterations.  Saint James depicted in a carving over north door, set in a scallop shell, also reported in stained glass but no evidence found as yet. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings.  In the churchyard there is a memorial preaching cross to Capt, John Samer who died in 1916, Saint James is reported carved on one side of the lantern, see British Listed Buildings for information and images.  CSJ holds some black and white images for this church.  Imformation/image of stained glass would be welcome.

Taunton, medieval wool town on strategic crossing point of River Tone.  Links with ports like Topsham and Lyme Regis.  CSJ holds various information/notes on the town.

  • Church of Saint James, possibly Saxon origins, a church was in existence on this site in the 12th century (just outside medieval walls/ditches) and was associated with the nearby priory. The current building is 15th century with substantial 19th C remodelling.  Saint James is reported depicted on the restored medieval font, although we do not have a clear image of this.   See British Listed Buildings and Church Website for details.  CSJ holds a guide booklet for church which confirms that the scallop shell is frequently encountered in the decoration of the church.
  • Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, possibly Saxon origins, a church was in existence on this site in the 12th century and became parish church of Taunton in early 14th century. The current building is 15th century with substantial 19th C remodelling.  Saint James is reported depicted in a niche between the clerestory windows, although we do not have an image to confirm this this. See British Listed Buildings and Church Website for details.

Upton

  • Tower of Saint James (all that remains of 14th century church).  See The Churches Conservation Trust website for details and images.
  • Church of Saint James, built 19th century to replace the demolished 14th century building.  See Exmoorian Website for information and images. No known depictions of Saint James.

Winscombe, Church of Saint James.   In existence by 13th century, origins may be earlier, this building mainly 15th century with 19/20th century restorations.  Saint James statue on eastern exterior of tower (binoculars needed to see this clearly). Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Parish Council Website, more images at Dawsonheritage.co.uk.  CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Also of Interest:

Chapel Cleeve Manor, built in 15th century as a pilgrim hospice to those visiting the Chapel of Saint Mary (chapel now disappeared).  Substantial later alterations to become a stately home. See Wikipedia, British Listed Buildings and British History Online for details.

Dunster, Church of Saint George.  Medieval stained glass containing a “palmer’s hat with cockle shells on the brim”.  Information can be found at Church Website history and guide.  An image of the window would be very helpful so we can see if it is in fact Saint James or pilgrim-related.

Muchelney, Abbey.  Saxon foundation, second-oldest abbey in Somerset, likely to have been a focus for many pilgrims.  A depiction of Saint James in stained glass is reported in the Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, more information and images would be welcome.  See Wikipedia and English Heritage website for details of the abbey

Pendomer, Church of Saint Roch, 13th century origin, church mainly 14/15th century.  Considerable repair and restoration has been carried out since 1979 when Mr E Sandiford left a generous bequest to the church.  See British Listed Buildings for information and Village Website for a PDF booklet with detailed history and pictures.

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Sussex (East & West)

Many thanks to Michael Fears for his diligent work on Sussex in 1990 which laid a very reliable foundation for this section.

Arundel

  • Hospital of Saint James (for female lepers) with associated chapel.  First recorded 1189.   By 1435 the hospital was abandoned and the chapel occupied by a hermit.  No trace exists.  See  British History Online and Arundel.org for information.
  • RC Cathedral Church of Our Lady and Saint Philip Howard, building completed 1873, became cathedral in 1865. Saint James is depicted in stone carving with Christ, the Virgin Mary and other apostles over the west door.   Information about the cathedral at cathedral website and wikipedia, image of west door carvings on Flickr.  A good close up image of Saint James would be helpful.

Ashburnham, Church of Saint Peter (previously dedicated to Saint Mary), built on Ashburnham estate next to stately home. 15th century tower, remainder rebuilt in 1665, this is an unusual example of Gothic style in 17th century.  The rebuilt north chapel, now called the Ashburnham Mausoleum Chapel, was once dedicated to Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and Sussex Parish Churches Website.  Confirmation of Saint James dedication from 1491 can be found on page 105 of Arthur Collins’ The Peerage of England (1768 edition), which is available online as a Google ebook. Image of chapel can be found on Flickr. CSJ  holds a one page leaflet for this church.

Ashurst, Church of Saint James.   Origin prior to 1200, mainly 13th century with 18th century restoration and 19th century south porch.  Chapel of Steyning parish until 16th century.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and  British History Online, information and images at Sussex Parish Churches Website.   CSJ holds a guidebook for this church.

Barnham, Church of Saint Mary the Virgin.   First recorded 1086, nave dates from around 1100 with later chancel and tower. A chantry chapel of Saint James was established by the Shelley family in 1324.  This chapel no longer exists, there is evidence of a vanished north aisle where perhaps this chapel was situated – this space now houses the organ – image on Geograph.org. No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed BuildingsBritish History Online, information and images at Sussex Parish Churches Website.

Birdham, Church of Saint James, dedicated to Saint Leonard until 1900.   13th/14th century with 16th century tower and 19th century restoration.  Saint James depicted in stained glass showing Jesus calling him and his brother John to follow Him, scallop shell above the scene.   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Sussex Parish Churches Website and Wikipedia (image of window).  Information about change in dedication from Village Website and P.42 of The History, Antiquities, and Topography of the County of Sussex, Volume 2, by Thomas Walker Horsfield (1835) – available as a free ebook on Google.  CSJ holds some photographs of this church, up-to-date digital images would be helpful.

Brighton, Church of Saint James.  1810-13, built as a chapel of ease, but was used as a dissenting chapel before finally being consecrated as an Anglican place of worship in 1826.  Demolished in 1950. Information can be found at mybrightonandhove.org.

Chichester

  • Leper Hospital of Saint Mary Magdalene and Saint James, founded outside eastern gate of city walls, probably during reign of Henry I.  In 1362 a charter confirmed 40 days’ indulgence to those who visited the hospital on those Saints’ days.  The hospital survived the Reformation but declined in the 17th century, and was destroyed by fire in 1781.  A cottage was built from the ruins and stands to this day in Swanfield Drive.  See British History online for details and Geograph.org for an image of the cottage.
  • Fair of Saint James, first recorded 1288 and held near the hospital. ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Sussex 2006.
  • Saint James Bridge.  Apparently mentioned in Horsefield’s The History, Antiquities, and Topography of the County of Sussex, Volume 1, which is unfortunately not available as an ebook.  Location unknown, is it possible that this is the bridge (or the precursor of such) spanning the Lavant to carry Stane Street (now the A285) to the eastern gate? The proximity to the hospital of Saint Mary Magdalene and Saint James would explain the name of the bridge.  More information please!
  • Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity.  Shrine of St Richard of Chichester, canonised in 1262, attracted many pilgrims until his tomb was destroyed in the Dissolution in 1538.  Votive crosses scratched on the Church of Saint Peter and Saint Mary at Fishbourne are attributed by some to pilgrims travelling on the turnpike from Portsmouth to Chichester. See Wikipedia for details of Saint Richard, see Chichester Cathedral Website and Wikipedia for information on the cathedral, and Yelp for details on the votive crosses at Fishbourne.

Eastbourne, Church of Saint Saviour and Saint Peter.  19th century highly-decorative Gothic Revival church.  Saint James depicted in a Clayton & Bell mosaic.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Sussex Parish Churches Website.  We cannot trace an image of the Saint James mosaic and a good quality digital image for the Flickr group would be appreciated.  CSJ holds a brief leaflet guide to this church.

East Grinstead, Fair of Saint James, 1248 by charter ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Sussex 2006.

Ewhurst Green, Church of Saint James. 12th century origins with some 14th century additions.  Saint James depicted in a painting with staff, water bottle, book with shell on cover.   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Sussex Parish Churches Website and roughwood.net (image of painting).    CSJ holds a postcard and a colour guidebook for this church.

Friston, Church of Saint James.  Some of nave may be pre-Conquest, with possible 12th century extension and 15th century roof.  Saint James depicted in two stained glass windows (19th and 20th century), one with with staff and book, one with staff water bottle, book and shell.   Information and images at Sussex Parish Churches Website and roughwood.net (images of windows).    CSJ holds a leaflet for this church and some photographs of the windows (up-to-date digital images would be helpful).

Heyshott, Church of Saint James. Late 13th century nave with 19th C rebuild elsewhere. No known depictions of Saint James.   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Sussex Parish Churches Website   CSJ holds a brief guide leaflet for this church.

Lewes

  • Hospital of Saint James, an almshouse for the poor, sick and for pilgrims, founded in 12th century and run additionally to, but maintained by, the priory.  Probably fell into disuse when the priory was dissolved as its source of income would have disappeared. Only the chancel remains which was once used as the pottery department of Lewes Priory School, but is now a private house. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, British History Online and Lewes Priory Trust (monument report and map).  Image at geograph.org (the flint building on the left is the chancel). CSJ holds a guide book to Lewes.
  • Church of Saint Michael-in-Lewes. Dates from around 1200.  Contains an 1880s stained glass image of Saint James (staff and gourd) designed by Henry Holiday. See church website for information about the church and an image of the window.  CSJ holds a brief guide leaflet for this church and photos of window (up-to-date digital images would be helpful)
  • Church of Saint John the Baptist (Southover Parish Church). Built in 12th century as a hospice for Lewes Priory, it became a parish church in the 13th century.  Contains 19th century stained glass window of Saint James (with staff) designed by Kempe. See Sussex Parish Churches Website for information and images of the church and Flickr for an image of the window.  CSJ holds a guide leaflet for this church and photos of window (up-to-date digital images would be helpful).

Lindfield, Fair of Saint James, 1343 by charter ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Sussex 2006.

Lyminster, Priory of Pynham, established mid-12th century on east bank of River Arun, known as “de calceto” or Calcetto, (the causeway).  The brothers were to celebrate daily in the chapel of Saint Bartholomew, to provide shelter for poor travellers and to keep the bridge and causeway to Arundel in good repair – see British History Online.   Walter le Kayn had his staff and scrip blessed here in the 14th century before setting out to Santiago – see p.28 of Sussex archaeological collections relating to the history and antiquities of the county.  All that remains of the priory is part of a 13th century tower, now incorporated into Priory Farmhouse, a private house – see British Listed Buildings for information and Heritage Explorer for information and an image.

Seaford

  • Hospital of Saint James, founded by 1260, at Sutton by Seaford, recorded as vacant by 1523.  There was also a leper Hospital of Saint Leonard in Seaford, maybe founded a century earlier but this suffered from severe flooding by the sea in the 14th century and seems to have merged with Saint James’ around this time. The location of Saint Leonard’s appears to be near Blatchington Road (also close to the church of Saint Leonard), the location of Saint James’ is unknown (Sutton by Seaford is in the east of Seaford). There is a great deal of information online, some of which is a little confusing –  see British History Online, Lewes Council, Sussex Express and Seaford-Sussex.org. Any clarification would be very welcome.
  • Fair of Saint James, 1301 by charter ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Sussex 2006.

Selham, Church of Saint James.  Probably late 11th century (although some conjecture that it is pre-Conquest) with later medieval additions and 19th century restoration. As at 1511 the church was dedicated to Saint Mary – please see British History Online (footnotes). No known depictions of Saint James.   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Sussex Parish Churches Website and CRSBI website.

Shoreham-by-sea

  • Hospital of Saint James, first mentioned in 1249, thought to have survived the Reformation.  The location (supported by some later documents such as wills), appears to have been just north-east of the church of Saint Mary de Haura (where votive crosses are marked on the interior columns). For information, please see  British History Online, Shorehambysea.com and Stmarydehaura.org.
  • Pilgrim Port, in 1422 the ship Trinity of Shoreham was licensed to carry pilgrims bound for Santiago.  At height of importance 12th and 13th centuries.  Please see British History Online for a very detailed history of Shoreham town and harbour.  The CSJ also holds a 1920 map of medieval Shoreham showing known and projected locations of various buildings/streets etc – however please note that some of the placings, e.g. the harbour, are not supported by more modern research.

Stedham, Church of Saint James.  First church built of local stone here in 1040, with a tower added in 17th century.  There is a tradition that the ancient yew tree in the churchyard was planted  when the first church was built.  By 1850 the church was structurally unsafe and too small to serve the village and was rebuilt.  Medieval wall paintings discovered during the works were sadly lost. Saint James is depicted in a late 20th window with a staff, facing 3 scallop shells.   Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online, information and images at Sussex Parish Churches Website, information about the window at stainedglassrecords.org and an image of the window at geograph.org.

Westham, Church of Saint Mary the Virgin.   Late 11th century with later chancel and tower, this church is reputed to be the first, or one of the first, Norman churches in England. It may be connected with the hospice of Saint Cross.  Saint James depicted as pilgrim with hat, staff and bag in tracery of 15th century east window  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online, information and images (including window) at Sussex Parish Churches Website.

West Wittering, Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, established in Saxon times but there is some debate as to how much, if any, of the fabric of the church dates back to the 10th century.  For information see British History OnlineBritish Listed Buildings and for information and images, Sussex Parish Churches Website.   There are various stories connecting Saint Richard of Chichester with this church, both that he visited it regularly, and that his relics were removed from Chichester during the Dissolution and placed in the Lady Chapel here – see Wikipedia for details.  The church may therefore have been a focus of pilgrimage in its own right. John Atte Wythestone had his staff and scrip blessed here in the 14th century before setting out to Santiago – see p.27 of Sussex archaeological collections relating to the history and antiquities of the county.

Winchelsea, pilgrim and trading port.  Old Winchelsea, founded around 800 on the shingle or “chesil” beach, was gradually lost to the sea in the 13th century and was re-sited further inland in 1288.  None of the old town survives, but many of the buildings from the grid-pattern new town do.  These include many cellars, built to store goods, particularly wine, one of which contains graffiti of ships scratched into the plaster while still wet.  See here for tours of the cellars.  The pilgrim hospice of the Franciscan friary “Salutation of the Angel and Our Lady of the Grey Friars” became the Salutation Inn and has been now been converted to cottages – see British Listed Buildings and Winchelsea.net walks for a map and image. Winchelsea was one of the most important pilgrim ports in the 14th and 15th century, evidenced by licences to carry 2,433 pilgrims in 1434 alone, and by its mention in a mid-15th century ballad.  See Winchelsea.com and Winchelsea.net for history details.

Wisborough Green, Church of Saint Peter ad Vincula, first recorded early 13th century, but building clearly dates from 12th century.  Saint James is depicted in an early 13th century wall painting with staff, bag and shells.  In 1538 the church was noted to hold the relics “the hair shirt, bones and comb of Saint James”.  Information and images, including a downloadable church guide, can be found on the church website and more information and images at painted church website.   The CSJ holds a guide booklet and postcards of the church.

Also of Interest:

Battle, The Pilgrim’s Rest.  Monastic guesthouse outside the gates of Battle Abbey, this building dates from 1420, although thought to have replaced an earlier hostel.  See British Listed Buildings and Pilgrim’s Rest website for details.

Beddingham, Church of Saint Andrew, Norman origins with later additions and 19th century restoration. There is a medieval wall painting which has been said to represent Saint James, others identify it as a female saint.  More information please! Information and images of the church can be found at Sussex Parish Churches Website, a close up of the painting at Geograph.org.   CSJ holds a very small leaflet for this church.

West Chiltington, Church of Saint Mary, Norman origins with later additions/alterations. There is a medieval wall painting which may represent Saint James, but it is said to be too damaged to be certain.  More information and an image of the painting would be welcome. Information and images of the church can be found at Sussex Parish Churches Website,    CSJ holds a guide booklet for this church.

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Tyne & Wear

Benwell, Church of Saint James. 19th century, built as a chapel of ease to the parish of Saint John in Newcastle.  Saint James in 19th century stained glass window (hat with shell, staff with gourd, book). Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Newcastlephotos.blogspot, information and a plan at St James Heritage & Environment Group and an image of the Saint James window at Madraban’s Flickr page.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church, a clearer image of the window would be helpful.

Fenham, Church of Saint James and Saint Basil. 1927-31, built as a memorial to James and Basil Knott who were killed in WWI. No known images of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and information and images on the Church Website.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Gateshead, Church of Saint James and Saint Bede, date unknown.  Saint James parish was created from Gateshead Saint Mary’s parish in 1864, and the parish of Saint James and Saint Bede was formed from a merger of Saint James’ parish and Venerable Bede parishes in 1883.  The churches from these two merged parishes have both now been demolished, the present church building is the former church hall of Saint Bede’s. Information and images can be found at the Parish Website.  No known images of Saint James. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Hebburn, RC Church of Saint James. 1967.  No known images of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at Parish Website, and picture by Bill Henderson at Geograph.org. CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Saint James’s United Reformed Church. Origin goes back to a “protestant dissenting” community of 1684, although this building is late 19th century.  No known images of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images on the Church Website.    CSJ does not hold any additional information/images for this church.

Also of Interest:

Rowlands Gill, Friarside Chapel, now ruined.  The origins of this small 14th century chapel, lying isolated near to the River Derwent, are obscure.  Some state that it began as a 12th century hermitage, some a chantry chapel, some that it belonged to a plague or leper hospital and some that it was a pilgrim hospice for those travelling between Jarrow and Blanchland.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online, some of the various speculations and legends on Questia, and an image by Christine Johnstone on Geograph.org.

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Wiltshire

With many thanks to Joanne Land for earlier research carried out on this county.

The CSJ holds a variety of maps and notes on routes and monastic establishments – more work is needed to develop this area of interest.

Abbeston (or Abbotstone), Chapel of Saint James. The free chapel belonging to the manor of More Abbeston was once recorded as Albestone Saint James in records 1311 – 1436.  Village of Abbestone and chapel long disappeared.  See page 318 of Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society document (listed under Whiteparish).   See also Whiteparish Community Website.

Ansty, Church of Saint James. This building dates from the 13th century, although it is likely an earlier church was established here as a priest is recorded before 1210. After this date the Knights Hospitaller of St John of Jerusalem had the advowson and remained in control until the Dissolution.   Saint James is depicted in a 19th century painting.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Village Website, British History Online and CofE Website.  Images can be found at Geograph.org. CSJ holds a mutilated guide and some small b/w photos for this church, up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome. (Please note that the building in Ansty known as the Old Commandery or Hospice does in fact date from the 1590s and is not related to the Hospitallers or pilgrim accommodation).

Avebury, Church of Saint James. The foundation date of this church is not known although the building retains many Anglo-Saxon features and is tentatively dated c.1000.  There have been various additions and alterations in the following centuries, culminating in a 19th century restoration. There are no confirmed images of Saint James although he may be depicted in the base of the restored 15th century rood screen.  The dedication in the 13th century was All Saints, it is not clear when this changed. Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wiltshire Council and Great English Churches.  CSJ holds two guides, a colour postcard and some small b/w photos for this church, up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be useful

Berwick St James, Church of Saint James. 12th century origin with later medieval alterations, a 17th century tower and a 19th century restoration. There are no confirmed images of Saint James although he may be depicted in a stained glass window – more information would be helpful. The 12th century chalice and 15th century paten are now in the British Museum. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online.  Images at Geograph.org.  CSJ holds a guide and some b/w photos for this church, up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome.

Bratton

  • Church of Saint James. Possible Saxon origin, this building is mainly 14th/15th century with a 19th century restoration. The church originally served the now lost village of Littlestoke, and may have started as a chapel of ease to Westbury. Bratton became a parish in its own right in the 19th century after some centuries of wrangling. There is a suggestion that the church may have previously been dedicated to Saint Margaret but there is no documentary evidence to support this, purely that a window in the church depicted a female saint. There are no known images of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wiltshire Council and British History Online.  Images at Geograph.org.  CSJ holds a detailed but scribbled on guide and some b/w photos for this church, up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome.
  • Cat’s Well, Holy well of Saint Katherine, thought by some to be situated on a pilgrim route to Edington Priory, see here for details.

Buttermere, Church of Saint James.  First recorded in 1268, the church was rebuilt in 1855-6 and restored in 1991. It is one of the remotest churches in Wiltshire – far away from main roads, even in the 14th century there were very few people living nearby.  There are no known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wiltshire OPC and British History Online.  Images at Geograph.org.

Cherhill, Church of Saint James.  In existence by the 12th century as a chapel dependent on Calne, this church is mainly 15th century with a 19th century restoration.  Saint James was reported depicted on a banner.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online.  Images at Geograph.org.  CSJ holds a variety of cuttings, photocopies, a postcard and some b/w photos for this church, up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome.

Corsley, Church of Saint Margaret of Antioch.  Originally a chapel dedicated to Saint James, rebuilt 1833 and restored 1891.  The date of the change of dedication is not clear.   There are no known depictions of Saint James. Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online.  Images at Geograph.org.  The CSJ holds a rather mutilated and scribbled on copy of The Story of Corsley and its Church.

Dauntsey, Church of Saint James. 12th century origins as , this church is mainly 14th/15th/16th century with a 15th century tower.  Original dedication was to Saint Mary but this changed around the middle 13th century, around the same time that Malmesbury Abbey gave up control.  There are no known depictions of Saint James. There is a 14th century Doom painting on boards above the chancel arch – a rare survival.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wiltshire Council and Painted Church.  CSJ holds two colour photos for this church, up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome.

Devizes, Church of Saint James. First mentioned in 1461, this “chapel on the green” may have originated as the chapel attached to the leper hospital of Saint James and Saint Denis, or may have been built on the site of the hospital after it disappeared after 1338.  The current building was rebuilt in 1831-2, except for the 15th century tower, which still bears cannonball marks from the Civil War.  Saint James is depicted in a stained glass window, and on a banner.  Information about the church and the hospital can be found at British History Online here and here, and information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings, Wiltshire Council and Church Website.  CSJ holds some b/w photos for this church, up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome, especially of the window.

Draycot Cerne, Church of Saint James. A church was on this site from the late 12th century.  This building dates from around 1300, with a 16th century tower and 19th century alterations.  The dedication was originally All Saints, then Saint Peter in the 18th century and seems to have changed to Saint James at some time in the late 19th or early 20th century. Saint James is depicted in 19th century stained glass.  Information can be found at British History Online, information and images at British Listed Buildings and Churches Conservation Trust.  More images, including the window, at Rootsweb Ancestry.  CSJ holds a cutting from a guidebook for this church, up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome, especially of the window.

Great Chalfield, Church of All Saints. 14th century, with a chapel added in 1480, further additions in 18th century and a 1914 restoration.  Saint James is reportedly depicted three times; twice on the 1914 organ casing (a figure with staff and book and a Martyrdom scene) and as a wooden figure in the chapel.  More information on the identification of the Martyrdom scene and the wooden figure would be very helpful.  The CSJ holds a small leaflet on the church and some photographs of the organ casing and wooden statue.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, and information and images can be found at Wiltshire Council, Great Chalfield Manor and Mike Pitts Blog.

Ludgershall

  • Church of Saint James. Founded in 12th century, probably shortly after the building of  Ludgershall Castle and Borough, it came under control of Amesbury Priory in 1228.  The building was extended in the 13th and 14th centuries with 16th and 19th century alterations.  Saint James is depicted in a 19th century stained glass window.  Information about Ludgershall and the church at British History Online, and information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and Church Website.  The CSJ holds a guide leaflet for this church. Up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome, especially of the window.
  • Fair of Saint James, prescriptive, recorded 1348 ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Wiltshire 2006.

Marston Meysey, Church of Saint James.  A chapel of ease was built the late 13th century by the De Meysey family, and this was rebuilt in 1648.  This was in turn replaced by a new parish church dedicated to Saint James in the 1870s. Saint James is depicted in 19th century stained glass (staff with gourd and book).  Information at British Listed Buildings and Wikipedia.  Images, including the window, at Rootsweb Ancestry.  Information about the pre-19th century dedication, and up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome.

North Newnton, Church of Saint James.  A church is believed to have been here since the 10th century.  This building dates from the 13th C with a 15th century tower and 19th century additions and alterations.  In 1442 relaxation of penance was granted to penitents visiting on the feasts of Saint James and Saint John, and the church became a popular pilgrim destination on Saint James’ Day. Information at British Listed Buildings and British History Online and information and image at Team Ministry Website.  There are no known depictions of Saint James.

North Wraxall, Church of Saint James.   This building dates from 12th century with later medieval additions and an 18th century north aisle. There is a stone figure of Saint James (staff, hat, shell) inserted above the 12th C doorway, the date of this figure is not known.  Information can be found at Wiltshire Council, information and images at British Listed Buildings, Wiltshire OPC and Bristol Information (including an image of the Saint James figure).  CSJ holds some b/w photos for this church, up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome, especially of the stone figure.

Salisbury

  • Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, foundation stone laid in 1220.  The western facade contains a 19th century stone figure of Saint James (hat and staff), although this is unfortunately rather damaged.  See Salisbury Cathedral website and Wikipedia for information, and Wikipedia for an image of the statue.  There is also a stained glass depiction of Saint James as a pilgrim, see SJITBI for an image.
  • Church of Saint Thomas and Saint Edmund. Founded 1220 for the workers building the Cathedral, with 14th and 15th century additions. It contains a Doom painting dating from 1470-1500, which is flanked by a figure of Saint James (staff, book, hat with shell).  The painting is popularly believed to have been commissioned by a pilgrim to give thanks for his safe return.  There are several problems with this; there is no documentary evidence to support the pilgrim commission story, the whole painting was heavily restored in oil paints in the 19th century, and the figure that is now Saint James was in fact identified as Henry II prior to repainting.  See British Listed Buildings (has photo of Doom painting), Wiltshire Council and Church Website for a variety of information and images.  The CSJ holds a postcard of the painting, an up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome.

Sevenhampton, Church of Saint James (may have been dedicated to Saint Andrew at one time, or this may be a mix-up with the Church of Saint Andrew at Sevenhampton in Gloucestershire – more information on this issue would be very helpful).  The church site is medieval in origin, this building was constructed in 1864. No known depictions of Saint James.  The author Ian Fleming is buried in the churchyard. Information at Church Website, information and images at British Listed Buildings.

South Wraxall, Church of Saint James.   This building has a 14th century tower, the remainder was rebuilt in the 19th century. No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings, information and images at Wiltshire Council.  CSJ holds a b/w photo for this church, up-to-date digital images for the Flickr group would be welcome.

Sutton Benger, Church of All Saints. 12th century, with 14th and 15th century additions and an 1851 restoration.  Saint James is depicted (hat, staff and book) in a tapestry displayed inside the church and believed to be formed of pieces of medieval altar cloth and vestments.  More information on the age and history of the tapestry would be helpful.  Information and images can be found at British Listed Buildings and at Wiltshire Council.   CSJ holds some pictures of the tapestry and the church, and some correspondence regarding the tapestry.

Stert, Church of Saint James.   A chapel was first recorded here in 1232, although the current building was constructed in 1846. No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at British Listed Buildings and British History Online. Images at Rootsweb Ancestry.  CSJ holds a photocopy of an illustration of the church prior to rebuilding.

Trowbridge

  • Church of Saint James.  Founded around 1200 to serve growing town, there were various rebuildings and alterations in medieval times, followed by a 19th century restoration.   The nave was damaged in 1990 when a storm toppled the spire and sent it crashing through the roof.  No known depictions of Saint James.  Information can be found at Wiltshire Council, information and images at British Listed Buildings.  CSJ holds various postcards and cuttings for this church.
  • Fair of Saint James, by charter 1200 ©Samantha Letters, Online Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516 Wiltshire 2006.

Tytherington, Church of Saint James.  Founded as a chapel in the early 12th century, this small and simple building mainly dates from the 16th century with a 19th century restoration.   No known depictions of Saint James.  Information and images can be found at Parish WebsiteWiltshire Council and  British Listed Buildings.  CSJ holds various pictures for this church.

Also of Interest:

Asserton (lost village near Berwick St James), a chapel stood here in medieval times. It is usually recorded as dedicated to Saint Mary Magdalene, but there has been a suggestion of a dedication to Saint James.  More information please!

Box, Chapel Plaister medieval pilgrim chapel/shelter. 13th century, rebuilt 14th century and had a porch and second floor added in 15th century (for accommodation?) See British Listed Buildings for information and Wiltshire Council website for information and pictures.

Castle Combe, Church of Saint Andrew, 13th and 14th, but mainly 15th century. Saint James is reported depicted on chancel arch.  More information and image would be very welcome to verify this.  Information and images at British Listed Buildings.

Donhead St Mary, Shute House and Pilgrim Cottage are both reputed to have provided shelter for pilgrims. See Wiltshire Council for information on this.  However, as Shute House is late 16th century (British Listed Buildings), and Pilgrim Cottage is 17th century (British Listed Buildings) this would seem very unlikely.  More information please!

Old Sarum, a chapel of Saint James is reported in a 720 charter of King Ine – See page 303 of Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society document.  More information please – would be helpful to know exactly what it states.

Ugford, a chapel and/or a hospital of Saint James? No trace now remains. Originally two villages, North and South Ugford or Ogeford, South Ugford was also known as Ugford or Ogeford Saint James, these are now merged into the tiny village of Ugford.  The hospital is most often referred to as dedicated to Saint John – see British History Online. More Information would be very helpful.

Warminster, a small jet figure was found in 1790, believed to be Saint James.  The location of this item is unknown but believed have formed part of the Halliday Collection of Antiquities and to have been donated to a local museum.  A similar example can be seen here.  Any information as to the whereabouts of this figure would be very welcome.

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